• Ozu’s Cinephilia

    By :: kogonada

15 comments

  • By Moviefan777
    June 04, 2014
    02:30 PM

    I never knew that Ozu left movie posters in his films! What a creative way to show off his cinephilia. :)
    Reply
  • By Barry Moore
    June 04, 2014
    04:48 PM

    What an interesting gallery, adding insight into the depth and scope of this great filmmaker's lifelong cinephilia. It's interesting that only one of the illustrations conveys the poster to a Japanese picture. The use of the poster for 'The Defiant Ones' seems like a humorous nod to the little boys' naive rebelliousness in 'Good Morning.' One wonders if the plethora of posters in Ozu's mise en scene suggests that the characters are as avid moviegoers as the director was in real life.
    Reply
  • By Sean
    June 04, 2014
    10:05 PM

    If I were an independent director or producer I would put movie posters in the movies to inspire others to think that there are more then just typical everyday movies out there besides mainstream Hollywood films being made today. Heck why not put one in an everyday Hollywood film even if most Americans don't care about older Hollywood, foreign, or independent films it might make them want pause the movie and go what movie is that? Maybe they'll want to look it up if ever possible if they ever pay attention to detail besides just the actor's face when watching the movie if you know what I mean by? If any of you are director's or producers maybe you should try putting some of your favorite movie posters in your movies try it out who knows it might get the younger generation curious what those movies are like? Be creative and see what happens if you do so!
    Reply
  • By Sean
    June 04, 2014
    10:25 PM

    For example if you look at The Three Amigos you'll notice that there are old vintage like movie posters in the film Now I can't say if they were authentic or real movie posters of the silent era but if you can put movie posters in an everyday Hollywood movie to get others curious about them or show an old movie in a cinema in scene to get them even more curious about them in a movie go for it I would do it if I were the director or producer! The Possibilities Are Endless!
    Reply
  • By Reeniop5
    June 05, 2014
    02:13 AM

    Brilliant! What a subtle way to pay tribute to his inspirations.
    Reply
  • By Sean
    June 07, 2014
    03:13 AM

    That's The Spirit Reeniop5!
    Reply
  • By Brian
    June 09, 2014
    07:27 AM

    Hope this interesting slideshow presages an upcoming Criterion release of I Graduated, But . . ., That Night's Wife, A Mother Should Be Loved and A Hen in the Wind. A Release of The Big Chill Is Nice, But . . .
    Reply
    • By Barry Moore
      June 09, 2014
      09:32 AM

      I concur that Criterion transfers of all the Ozu titles you mentioned would be most welcome. Even better would be some body or institution making these films available to be experienced as projected celluloid film prints to a wide public. DVDs, for all their utility and beauty, constitute not a continuation of cinema, but are rather another symptom of its demise.
  • By Billy
    June 17, 2014
    01:29 AM

    Yasujiro Ozu's 1929 film, Fighting Friends, includes a poster of Ralph Ince's The Uninvited Guest (1924).
    Reply
  • By locke
    June 27, 2014
    06:36 PM

    Isn't there also a poster in the Beard's room in "The Lady and the Beard"?
    Reply
  • By Michael K.
    June 27, 2014
    06:38 PM

    Thanks for the great gallery. Another American film poster, for Robert Mitchum's "Foreign Intrigue" (1956) can be seen very briefly in the Café Étoile scene of Ozu's "Tokyo Twilight" (1957).
    Reply
  • By Mashi
    June 27, 2014
    08:53 PM

    Thank you for this post! It may prove to be such a helpful teaching aid!
    Reply
  • By Don
    June 28, 2014
    01:49 AM

    What a beautiful new set of observations on Ozu's films. Someone at Criterion has a sharp eye and a deep dedication to Ozu. Readers of Richie, Bordwell and Desser knew that Ozu watched and learned from non-Japanese films, but how interesting it is that we can add to the specific list in this way; and how interesting it is that Ozu showed posters of nine foreign films but only one Japanese film. Now, will there ever be a collection of Ozu's letters published in English? Does one exist in Japanese? Has there ever been a full-length bio of Ozu in either language?
    Reply
  • By Doug Cummings
    June 28, 2014
    01:39 PM

    Can't believe you're missing SEVENTH HEAVEN from DAYS OF YOUTH.
    Reply
  • By QuQCDegueulasse
    August 07, 2014
    07:49 PM

    In Dragnet Girl (1933) there's a French poster for Lewis Milestone's All Quiet On The Western Front (1930).
    Reply