The Current

A magazine of film culture past and present, with new articles, interviews, and videos published every day

Ain’t Nobody’s Business If the Lady Sings the Blues

First Person

Ain’t Nobody’s Business If the Lady Sings the Blues

In the 1970s, a decade when blaxploitation ruled, Lady Sings the Blues offered a rare tender vision of Black love and masculinity.

By A. Van Jordan

An Indonesian Classic in a New Light: A Conversation on the Landmark Restoration of After the Curfew
An Indonesian Classic in a New Light: A Conversation on the Landmark Restoration of After the Curfew

Two key figures in the pathbreaking project, Lisabona Rahman and Lintang Gitomartoyo, discuss its significance for Indonesian cinema, the challenges they faced while working on it, and the legacy of the film’s director, Usmar Ismail.

The Criterion Channel’s March 2021 Lineup

Channel Calendars

The Criterion Channel’s March 2021 Lineup

Giddy up, movie lovers! This month on the Channel, our Black Westerns series leads the charge, highlighting films that have challenged the myths of the Old West to tell the stories of African Americans on the frontier.

An Inside Look at Brooklyn-Based Artist Juan Miguel Marin’s Meditative Process

Studio Visits

An Inside Look at Brooklyn-Based Artist Juan Miguel Marin’s Meditative Process

The man behind the artwork for our releases of The Cremator, Man Push Cart, and Chop Shop talks with us about how his Ecuadorian roots and his love of performance inform his enigmatic images.

Chop Shop: American Hustle
Chop Shop: American Hustle

With novelistic intimacy, Rahmin Bahrani’s follow-up to Man Push Cart illuminates the economic desperation hiding in plain sight in contemporary America.

By Viet Thanh Nguyen

Man Push Cart: A Melancholy Pull
Man Push Cart: A Melancholy Pull

Set in a transient, post-9/11 New York City, Rahmin Bahrani’s feature debut follows the Sisyphean toil of a Pakistani immigrant whose life teeters on the verge of catastrophe.

By Bilge Ebiri

Smooth Talk: Girl Power
Smooth Talk: Girl Power

A film that now plays like a harbinger of the #MeToo movement, Joyce Chopra’s first fiction feature shows how the myths that direct how girls come of age threaten their safe passage to womanhood.

By Honor Moore

Love’s Labors: The Killing Floor Illuminates the Dream of an Interracial Workers’ Movement
Love’s Labors: The Killing Floor Illuminates the Dream of an Interracial Workers’ Movement

Bill Duke’s feature debut is a rarity in American cinema: a labor film, funded by unions and public money, that balances political urgency with emotional tenderness.

By Blair McClendon

Jean-Claude Carrière, Harvester of Cinema
Jean-Claude Carrière, Harvester of Cinema

A close friend and collaborator of Carrière’s reflects on the late writer’s fearless approach to the creative process and the source of his staggering productivity.

By Volker Schlöndorff

Mandabi: Paper Trail
Mandabi: Paper Trail

Ousmane Sembène’s second feature departs from his early-career critiques of colonial power, instead focusing on the oppressive forces manifested within postcolonial African society.

By Tiana Reid

The Intricate Portraiture at the Heart of Our Mandabi Release
The Intricate Portraiture at the Heart of Our Mandabi Release

New York–based artist Ify Chiejina walks us through the multifaceted process of creating four new pieces inspired by Ousmane Sembène’s 1968 satire.

By Eric Skillman

A Tendency Toward Dirty Laundry: Camille Billops and James Hatch’s Unflinchingly Personal Cinema
A Tendency Toward Dirty Laundry: Camille Billops and James Hatch’s Unflinchingly Personal Cinema

Rooted in their trailblazing work as archivists of Black culture, the duo’s transgressively candid documentaries combine revelations of family life with cultural analysis.

By Yasmina Price

Video

Gian Galang Summons the Kinetic Energy of a Martial-Arts Icon
Inside Criterion  – 29 Jun 2020