Current

An online magazine covering film culture past and present

American Families

Deep Dives

American Families

A collage of home-movie footage dating from the 1920s to the 1960s, Alain Berliner’s The Family Album raises questions about how we understand and imagine American life in that era.

By Radha Vatsal

Alphabet Soup: A Conversation with Topaz Jones and rubberband.
Alphabet Soup: A Conversation with Topaz Jones and rubberband.

The filmmakers behind Don’t Go Tellin’ Your Momma talk about finding inspiration in the Black ABCs, an 1970s educational resource that gave Black students a letter chart reflective of their experiences.

By Beatrice Loayza

The Criterion Channel’s December 2021 Lineup

Channel Calendars

The Criterion Channel’s December 2021 Lineup

Celebrate the holidays with our 21-film Alfred Hitchcock retrospective and a series dedicated to collaborations between female directors and cinematographers.

The Silences of the Silent Era
The Silences of the Silent Era

A string of recent programs, including the Pordenone Silent Film Festival, have illuminated important actors and filmmakers whose success challenges the impression that early cinema was exclusively the preserve of white men.

By ​Pamela Hutchinson

How to Get Your Citizen Kane Blu⁠-⁠ray Disc 1 Replaced
How to Get Your Citizen Kane Blu⁠-⁠ray Disc 1 Replaced

We discovered this weekend that there is a problem with Blu-ray disc 1 in all of our Citizen Kane editions that affects the contrast in the feature film. We’ll be making replacements available to all of our customers!

Menace II Society: The Truth Hurts
Menace II Society: The Truth Hurts

With the candor and rage of many hip-hop albums of the nineties, the Hughes brothers’ controversial debut feature depicts Watts as a pitiless urban war zone with no exit.

By Craig D. Lindsey

Uncut Gems: “Taking It to the Rack”
Uncut Gems: “Taking It to the Rack”

The Safdie brothers explore money, basketball, and racial tensions in this manic tale of a New York City jewelry dealer’s existential meltdown.

By J. Hoberman

Citizen Kane: The Once and Future Kane
Citizen Kane: The Once and Future Kane

Modern in conception but postmodern in effect, the film hailed by many as the greatest ever made has been the subject of cinephilic passion and intense critical analysis since its release in 1941.

By Bilge Ebiri

“It Might Be You” Brings Tootsie’s Queer Potential to the Surface

Songbook

“It Might Be You” Brings Tootsie’s Queer Potential to the Surface

In the context of Sydney Pollack’s gender-crossing comedy, the mellow love theme sung by Stephen Bishop suggests that the plenitude of romantic possibility has the power to break down social boundaries.

By Karen Tongson

Fatal Attraction: Women on the Serial-Killer Movies That Thrill Them
Fatal Attraction: Women on the Serial-Killer Movies That Thrill Them

Six writers confront their fascination with films about murderers, including the true-crime shocker Angst, the quasi-documentary Landscape Suicide, and the erotic thriller In the Cut.

Once Upon a Time in China: The Complete Films: Past Master
Once Upon a Time in China: The Complete Films: Past Master

Tsui Hark’s epic martial-arts saga revolutionized Hong Kong cinema by presenting a complex portrait of modern Chinese history and setting a gold standard in action choreography.

By Maggie Lee

Life of a Legend: A Brief History of Wong Fei-hung On-Screen
Life of a Legend: A Brief History of Wong Fei-hung On-Screen

Starting with his first movie, in 1949, the Cantonese folk hero became a pop-culture phenomenon whose personality evolved to suit the times.

By Grady Hendrix

Video

Caitlin Kuhwald’s Hand-Drawn Portraits Bring Iconic Faces to Life
Inside Criterion  – 13 Sep 2021