Current

An online magazine covering film culture past and present

Devi: Seeing and Believing
Devi: Seeing and Believing

Considered his first directly political film, Satyajit Ray’s 1960 masterpiece explores how the denial of self-knowledge, a void neither religion nor Western rationalism can fill, takes a toll on women in Indian society.

By Devika Girish

Across the Lines: Ira Sachs’s Class-Conscious Debut
Across the Lines: Ira Sachs’s Class-Conscious Debut

In the landscape of gay-themed cinema, which often focuses on positivity and pride, The Delta stands out for asking unsettling questions about the limits of queer connection across socioeconomic and racial divides.

By Michael Koresky

Two Fly-on-the-Wall Documentaries Chronicle Trans Life in the Shadows

Deep Dives

Two Fly-on-the-Wall Documentaries Chronicle Trans Life in the Shadows

Made in the 1990s, The Salt Mines and The Transformation take an unflinching look at the bigotry and economic hardships faced by a community of trans sex workers of color.

By Caden Mark Gardner

Who’s That Woman?: Mickey Sumner in Frances Ha

Performances

Who’s That Woman?: Mickey Sumner in Frances Ha

Both the foil and the mirror to Greta Gerwig’s beloved heroine, the role of Sophie comes alive in a performance imbued with emotional candor and prickly autonomy.

By Kyle Turner

The Incredible Shrinking Man: Other Dimensions
The Incredible Shrinking Man: Other Dimensions

This uncanny tale of existential anxiety stands out as the most rigorously pared-down American science-fiction film of the 1950s.

By Geoffrey O’Brien

Ratcatcher: A Flashlight Cinema
Ratcatcher: A Flashlight Cinema

In her astonishing debut feature, Lynne Ramsay synthesizes narrative drama and poetic exploration, the social and the surreal.

By Girish Shambu

Ratcatcher: Spine Number 162
Ratcatcher: Spine Number 162

The Academy Award–winning director remembers a formative and eye-opening encounter with Lynne Ramsay’s feature debut.

By Barry Jenkins

Beyond Visible: Gina Prince-Bythewood on the Necessity of Black Women’s Cinema
Beyond Visible: Gina Prince-Bythewood on the Necessity of Black Women’s Cinema

The director of Love & Basketball reflects on more than twenty years of bringing the underrepresented stories of her community to the big and small screen.

By Rebecca Carroll

10 Things I Learned: Melvin Van Peebles: Essential Films
10 Things I Learned: Melvin Van Peebles: Essential Films

The consulting producer of our box-set tribute to one of American cinema’s most uncompromising artists shares some facts she learned about the filmmaker’s eclectic career and global perspective.

By Racquel J. Gates

Revolutionary Artist: Emory Douglas on the Black Panthers and Melvin Van Peebles
Revolutionary Artist: Emory Douglas on the Black Panthers and Melvin Van Peebles

The illustrator behind the cover image of our box set Melvin Van Peebles: Essential Films speaks with the edition’s designer about his history-making, boldly political aesthetic.

By Julian Alexander

High Sierra: Crashing Out
High Sierra: Crashing Out

In Raoul Walsh’s elegy for the Depression-era archetype of the noble outlaw, Humphrey Bogart plays an old-fashioned desperado who has outlived his time.

By Imogen Sara Smith

A Screen of One’s Own: Celebrating Artist-Run Cinemas Around the World
A Screen of One’s Own: Celebrating Artist-Run Cinemas Around the World

From Richard Linklater to Isabelle Huppert to Tsai Ming-liang, some of cinema’s most revered artists have shown their commitment to the art form by running art-house theaters with stellar repertory programs.

By Nicolas Rapold

Video

Caitlin Kuhwald’s Hand-Drawn Portraits Bring Iconic Faces to Life
Inside Criterion  – 13 Sep 2021