On Film

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1113 Results

Husbands: Vows
Husbands: Vows

A film of volatile emotions that provides no catharsis, John Cassavetes’s exploration of masculinity finds the director at his most existential and abstract.

By Andrew Bujalski

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A Singular Voice, in Short
A Singular Voice, in Short

Martin Scorsese’s stylistically varied early short films reveal the energy and invention that would make him one of the most exciting American directors of his time.

By Bilge Ebiri

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Wildlife: What Is and What Isn’t
Wildlife: What Is and What Isn’t

In this remarkably restrained adaptation of a Richard Ford novel, the midcentury American dream gives way to harsh reality as one Montana family begins to fall apart.

By Mark Harris

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Dance, Girl, Dance: Gotta Dance
Dance, Girl, Dance: Gotta Dance

Pioneering Hollywood filmmaker Dorothy Arzner brought a rare feminist sensibility to this backstage drama that explores the role of ambition, friendship, and love in the lives of two dancers.

By Sheila O’Malley

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The Great Escape: Not Caught
The Great Escape: Not Caught

John Sturges’s POW drama is an ode to ingenuity and cooperation that anticipated a wave of demythologizing war films.

By Sheila O’Malley

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Me and You and Everyone We Know: Punk Cars Bodies Movies
Me and You and Everyone We Know: Punk Cars Bodies Movies

Miranda July took her punk spirit and wild imagination to the big screen with this first feature, which explores universal themes of shame and pain through her singular voice.

By Sara Magenheimer

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Me and You and Everyone We Know: Performance Rites
Me and You and Everyone We Know: Performance Rites

The characters in Miranda July’s film long for a radical vulnerability that remains forever beyond their grasp.

By Lauren Groff

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The Cremator: “No One Will Suffer”
The Cremator: “No One Will Suffer”

Juraj Herz’s macabre tale of madness epitomizes the artistic and political audacity of Czechoslovak cinema during its golden age of liberalization, a period that would soon prove to be short-lived.

By Jonathan Owen

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Destry Rides Again: Riding High
Destry Rides Again: Riding High

After a career drought, Marlene Dietrich roared back to fame and acclaim with this ingenious comedy-western hybrid, made in what is widely considered one of the peak years of the studio system.

By Farran Smith Nehme

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Show Boat: Rollin’ on the River
Show Boat: Rollin’ on the River

A landmark stage musical receives its greatest cinematic treatment in this beautifully mounted saga that reflects the changing state of race relations across three generations.

By Gary Giddins

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The Prince of Tides: The Artist’s Mirror
The Prince of Tides: The Artist’s Mirror

The result of a three-and-a-half-year quest, this Oscar-nominated drama is a high-water mark in the career of one of Hollywood’s most distinguished artists.

By Bruce Eder

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The Cranes Are Flying: A Free Camera
The Cranes Are Flying: A Free Camera

A war film that emphasizes personal drama over public platitude, this masterpiece by Mikhail Kalatozov features the vitality and freewheeling cinematic experimentation characteristic of post-Stalin cinema.

By Chris Fujiwara

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Leave Her to Heaven: The Eyes of Ellen Berent
Leave Her to Heaven: The Eyes of Ellen Berent

In this Technicolor film noir masterpiece, Gene Tierney stars as one of cinema’s most dangerous and sympathetic femmes fatales, a woman who finds it impossible to conform to postwar gender roles.

By Megan Abbott

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Bamboozled: New Millennium, Same Bullshit
Bamboozled: New Millennium, Same Bullshit

For one of the most provocative and eerily prescient films of his career, Spike Lee confronted the racist neo-minstrelsy that continues to pervade mass entertainment.

By Ashley Clark

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Salesman: For God and Company
Salesman: For God and Company

Chronicling the trials of a door-to-door salesman in midcentury America, this incisive portrait of consumer culture revolutionized the art of documentary filmmaking.

By Michael Chaiken

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Three Fantastic Journeys by Karel Zeman: Storm of Craft
Three Fantastic Journeys by Karel Zeman: Storm of Craft

One of Czechoslovak cinema’s masters of illusion dazzled audiences with obsessively handcrafted fantasias that combined live action, animation, and the influence of nineteenth-century graphic illustration.

By Michael Atkinson

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Paris Is Burning: The Fire This Time
Paris Is Burning: The Fire This Time

New York City’s 1980s drag-ball scene comes to vibrant life in Jennie Livingston’s documentary, a landmark chronicle of the resilience and realness of queer communities of color.

By Michelle Parkerson

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Teorema: Just a Boy
Teorema: Just a Boy

Pier Paolo Pasolini’s seemingly irreconcilable allegiances to Marx, Freud, and Jesus Christ come to the fore in this radical provocation, which marks the midway point of the polymathic artist’s filmmaking career.

By James Quandt

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Roma, or the Art of Making Ruins
Roma, or the Art of Making Ruins

Alfonso Cuarón’s vivid re-creation of his childhood memories holds up a mirror to the social instability that roiled his hometown in the 1970s.

By Valeria Luiselli

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The Layers of Roma
The Layers of Roma

In a polarized and violent world, Alfonso Cuarón’s masterpiece offers a pure message of human solidarity that transcends class and race. But its story is also firmly rooted in the historical specificity of 1970s Mexico City.

By Enrique Krauze

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Fail Safe: Very Little Left of the World
Fail Safe: Very Little Left of the World

Sidney Lumet brought his vivid sense of the messiness of human experience to this stark nuclear thriller, which centers on a series of earth-shattering decisions made in quiet rooms.

By Bilge Ebiri

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All About My Mother: Matriarchal Society
All About My Mother: Matriarchal Society

Of the many odes to motherhood in Pedro Almodóvar’s filmography, this Oscar-winning hit is the most exquisite exploration of maternal love’s all-consuming power.

By Emma Wilson

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Le petit soldat: The Awful Truth
Le petit soldat: The Awful Truth

One of the lesser-known films in Godard’s extraordinary run of 1960s masterpieces, this severe, angular thriller was the director’s first foray into the political territory that would prove so essential to his later work.

By Nicholas Elliott

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Holiday: Play Mates
Holiday: Play Mates

With the chemistry they perfected in their third collaboration, Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant proved they were a match made in screwball heaven.

By Dana Stevens

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