On Film

3696 Results

Chop Shop: American Hustle
Chop Shop: American Hustle

With novelistic intimacy, Rahmin Bahrani’s follow-up to Man Push Cart illuminates the economic desperation hiding in plain sight in contemporary America.

By Viet Thanh Nguyen

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Man Push Cart: A Melancholy Pull
Man Push Cart: A Melancholy Pull

Set in a transient, post-9/11 New York City, Rahmin Bahrani’s feature debut follows the Sisyphean toil of a Pakistani immigrant whose life teeters on the verge of catastrophe.

By Bilge Ebiri

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Publishing in a Pandemic
Publishing in a Pandemic

We’re losing Cinefex but gaining a newly robust Screen Slate. And the new Cineaste is out, along with this year’s Hollywood issue of Vanity Fair.

By David Hudson

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Smooth Talk: Girl Power
Smooth Talk: Girl Power

A film that now plays like a harbinger of the #MeToo movement, Joyce Chopra’s first fiction feature shows how the myths that direct how girls come of age threaten their safe passage to womanhood.

By Honor Moore

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In the Works
In the Works

Here’s the latest on projects coming from Todd Haynes, Chloé Zhao, David Cronenberg, Yorgos Lanthimos, and Claire Denis.

By David Hudson

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Love’s Labors: The Killing Floor Illuminates the Dream of an Interracial Workers’ Movement
Love’s Labors: The Killing Floor Illuminates the Dream of an Interracial Workers’ Movement

Bill Duke’s feature debut is a rarity in American cinema: a labor film, funded by unions and public money, that balances political urgency with emotional tenderness.

By Blair McClendon

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Jean-Claude Carrière, Harvester of Cinema
Jean-Claude Carrière, Harvester of Cinema

A close friend and collaborator of Carrière’s reflects on the late writer’s fearless approach to the creative process and the source of his staggering productivity.

By Volker Schlöndorff

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Shifts and Ricochets

Did You See This?

Shifts and Ricochets

This week’s round takes us from Italy in the 1950s and ’60s to America in the ’70s and Hong Kong in the ’90s.

By David Hudson

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February Books
February Books

We’re reading about Visconti, Fellini, Tom Stoppard, Eartha Kitt, and Anton Walbrook.

By David Hudson

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Mark Harris’s Mike Nichols: A Life
Mark Harris’s Mike Nichols: A Life

Reviews are strong for the biography of the unique theater and film director, comedian and actor.

By David Hudson

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Mandabi: Paper Trail
Mandabi: Paper Trail

Ousmane Sembène’s second feature departs from his early-career critiques of colonial power, instead focusing on the oppressive forces manifested within postcolonial African society.

By Tiana Reid

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A Tendency Toward Dirty Laundry: Camille Billops and James Hatch’s Unflinchingly Personal Cinema
A Tendency Toward Dirty Laundry: Camille Billops and James Hatch’s Unflinchingly Personal Cinema

Rooted in their trailblazing work as archivists of Black culture, the duo’s transgressively candid documentaries combine revelations of family life with cultural analysis.

By Yasmina Price

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Masters in Pieces

Did You See This?

Masters in Pieces

This week we’re revisiting Tarkovsky, catching up with Shelley Duvall, and listening to Edgar Wright and Quentin Tarantino talk movies.

By David Hudson

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Berlinale 2021 Lineup
Berlinale 2021 Lineup

The virtual first half of this year’s festival will premiere new work from Céline Sciamma, Hong Sangsoo, Dominik Graf, and Ryusuke Hamaguchi.

By David Hudson

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The Acrobatic Grace of Cary Grant
The Acrobatic Grace of Cary Grant

In the actor’s inimitable comedic work, he undercut his trademark suavity with moments of slapstick mayhem, creating a contrast that hinted at the chasm between his private life and public persona.

By Angelica Jade Bastién

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The Dauntingly Inventive Jean-Claude Carrière
The Dauntingly Inventive Jean-Claude Carrière

Carrière was a humble and eager collaborator, working with Buñuel, Forman, Malle, Oshima, Schlöndorff, Wajda, and Godard.

By David Hudson

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The Parallax View: Dark Towers
The Parallax View: Dark Towers

Alan J. Pakula captured the anxiety of the seventies in this noir-inflected conspiracy thriller, which offers a critique both of American institutions and of the self-made heroes who do battle with them.

By Nathan Heller

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Giuseppe Rotunno: “It’s Like Being a Painter”
Giuseppe Rotunno: “It’s Like Being a Painter”

Renowned for his work with Fellini, Visconti, and Bob Fosse, Rotunno was the first non-American to join the American Society of Cinematographers.

By David Hudson

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Pebbles Tops the Rotterdam 2021 Awards
Pebbles Tops the Rotterdam 2021 Awards

This year’s winners come from India, Corsica, Kosovo, Argentina, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Thailand.

By David Hudson

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Daring Pursuits

Did You See This?

Daring Pursuits

This week we’re reading Nick Pinkerton on Fassbinder’s problems with Chabrol and revisiting films by Marguerite Duras, Lizzie Borden, and Béla Tarr.

By David Hudson

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Sundance 2021 Awards
Sundance 2021 Awards

Here’s an overview of what critics have been saying about this year’s winners.

By David Hudson

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Cicely Tyson: “I Stayed on the Right Track”
Cicely Tyson: “I Stayed on the Right Track”

The lauded star of film, television, and theater was “determined to do all I could to alter the narrative about Black people.”

By David Hudson

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Rotterdam 2021, Phase One
Rotterdam 2021, Phase One

Critics and programmers introduce the thirty titles lined up for the Tiger and Big Screen competitions.

By David Hudson

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Dancing in the Dark

Dark Passages

Dancing in the Dark

A powerful motif in film noir from around the world, dance is by turns a tool of seduction, a source of humiliation, and a symbol of the pleasures and risks of spectatorship.

By Imogen Sara Smith

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