On Film

3216 Results

When We Were Kings: Ready to Fight
When We Were Kings: Ready to Fight

Drawn from a treasure trove of footage, this Oscar-winning documentary explores a watershed moment for one of the world’s greatest athletes—an international spectacle that revealed the complexities of black identity.

By ​Kelefa Sanneh

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MoMA’s Back
MoMA’s Back

Newly renovated and expanded, New York’s Museum of Modern Art integrates the story of cinema into its history of modernism.

By David Hudson

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A Cantopop Dream Girl’s First Film Reverie

Songbook

A Cantopop Dream Girl’s First Film Reverie

Hong Kong pop icon Faye Wong made her screen breakthrough in Wong Kar-wai’s Chungking Express, a film that also features her hypnotic cover version of the Cranberries’ hit “Dreams.”

By Oliver Wang

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Harsh Visions

Did You See This?

Harsh Visions

Maurice Pialat, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Béla Tarr, Robert Eggers, and Disney’s most notorious feature make for a rough and tumble week.

By David Hudson

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Tokyo in New York
Tokyo in New York

Two series offer a wide range of thematic and historical perspectives on the Japanese capital.

By David Hudson

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The Silent Gaze in Satyajit Ray’s Almost-Love Story

Deep Dives

The Silent Gaze in Satyajit Ray’s Almost-Love Story

In one of his most underrated gems, now playing on the Criterion Channel, the Bengali master explored the futility of words and the power of a look.

By Terrence Rafferty

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October Books
October Books

This month’s round includes new critical assessments of Bresson and Rohmer, Hollywood memoirs, and interviews with living legends.

By David Hudson

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Häxan: “Let Her Suffering Begin”
Häxan: “Let Her Suffering Begin”

Decades before the witch became a staple of horror cinema, Benjamin Christensen used this gothic figure to explore the oppression of women in different historical periods.

By Chloé Germaine Buckley

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Häxan: The Real Unreal
Häxan: The Real Unreal

Integrating fact, fiction, objective reality, hallucination, and different levels of representation, this silent masterpiece invented what decades later would be known as the essay film.

By Chris Fujiwara

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Robert Forster’s Wild Trajectory
Robert Forster’s Wild Trajectory

After breaking through in Medium Cool, Forster floundered until Quentin Tarantino plucked him from undeserved obscurity nearly thirty years later.

By David Hudson

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“What Cinema Is For”

Did You See This?

“What Cinema Is For”

Highlighted this week are an alternative history, the state of the documentary, and the influence of Antonioni and Pialat.

By David Hudson

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On the Waterfront

Dark Passages

On the Waterfront

Pessimism, melancholy, and corruption come in with the tide in the greatest seaside noirs, including classics by Josef von Sternberg, Ingmar Bergman, and Marcel Carné.

By Imogen Sara Smith

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Edward Norton’s Motherless Brooklyn
Edward Norton’s Motherless Brooklyn

The rights to Jonathan Lethem’s novel were secured twenty years ago, and now that film is finally rolling out, reviews are mixed.

By David Hudson

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Spotlight on Documentary 2019
Spotlight on Documentary 2019

This year’s program has taken NYFF attendees to Soviet Russia, Lebanon, Chile, back home to the Big Apple, and behind bars.

By David Hudson

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Federico Veiroj’s The Moneychanger
Federico Veiroj’s The Moneychanger

Daniel Hendler plays a man who freely admits that his trade is “the root of all evil.”

By David Hudson

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Without Motive: The Last Scene in High and Low

One Scene

Without Motive: The Last Scene in High and Low

The director of Audition and First Love dives into the haunting moral ambiguity of Akira Kurosawa’s crime masterpiece.

By Takashi Miike

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Projections 2019
Projections 2019

Critics respond to the New York Film Festival’s selection of new moving image art.

By David Hudson

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This Pretty World: The Films of Val Lewton
This Pretty World: The Films of Val Lewton

In their stillness and melancholy, the B-movie masterpieces of one of Hollywood’s most ingenious producers pushed against the official optimism of American culture during World War II.

By Alexander Nemerov

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Kara Walker, TikTok, and Jump Cut

Did You See This?

Kara Walker, TikTok, and Jump Cut

Artists’ and amateurs’ videos, Ida Lupino, and TIFF Cinematheque programmers’ notes all figure in this week’s round.

By David Hudson

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Charlie the Ringmaster
Charlie the Ringmaster

Charlie Chaplin earned a remarkable level of autonomy at the height of his career, but he also cultivated a team of loyal collaborators who helped him bring his dreams to the screen.

By Steve Massa

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Kelly Reichardt’s First Cow
Kelly Reichardt’s First Cow

The director reunites with writer Jonathan Raymond and cinematographer Christopher Blauvelt for a quiet tale set in the Oregon Territory of the 1820s.

By David Hudson

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London 2019
London 2019

Armando Iannucci’s The Personal History of David Copperfield opens this year’s bounteous edition.

By David Hudson

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Celebrating Shirley Clarke
Celebrating Shirley Clarke

Retrospectives in New York and on the Criterion Channel mark the hundredth birthday of the pioneering filmmaker.

By David Hudson

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Jean-Pierre Melville, My Father in the Art
Jean-Pierre Melville, My Father in the Art

Veteran French director Bertrand Tavernier reflects on how one of his greatest mentors fused two seemingly contradictory influences—that of the Resistance and of American genre filmmaking—into a remarkably cohesive body of work.

By Bertrand Tavernier

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