On Film

3177 Results

Trains of Light and Sound

Did You See This?

Trains of Light and Sound

Lucrecia Martel, Annette Michelson, Satyajit Ray, and Joanna Hogg feature in this week’s round.

By David Hudson

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The Notes in Between: A Conversation with Nicholas Britell
The Notes in Between: A Conversation with Nicholas Britell

One of the most sought-after composers in film and television opens up about his genre-defying sound and his deeply collaborative relationships with directors.

By Hillary Weston

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Hidden Histories: The Story of Women Film Editors
Hidden Histories: The Story of Women Film Editors

A new web resource spearheaded by Su Friedrich celebrates women editors from around the world, highlighting work that has long been obscured by the masculinism of auteurist film culture.

By Girish Shambu

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Robert Frank, American Artist
Robert Frank, American Artist

Following his landmark collection of photographs, The Americans, Frank made essential films about the Beats, the Stones, and his own personal tragedies.

By David Hudson

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Rian Johnson’s Knives Out
Rian Johnson’s Knives Out

The comedic murder mystery in the grand tradition of Agatha Christie has scored an outstanding round of early reviews.

By David Hudson

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The Cloud-Capped Star: A Cry for Life
The Cloud-Capped Star: A Cry for Life

In this landmark melodrama, director Ritwik Ghatak channeled his grief over the destruction of his beloved homeland, Bengal, in the wake of the Partition of India.

By Ira Bhaskar

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Mystery of Faith: What “the Breath of Religion” Means to Mark Le Fanu
Mystery of Faith: What “the Breath of Religion” Means to Mark Le Fanu

In his thought-provoking latest book, the critic and frequent Criterion contributor traces the complex ways European filmmakers have grappled with the influences of Christianity and modernity.

By Andrew Chan

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Venice 2019: “What a Weird Year”
Venice 2019: “What a Weird Year”

The jury presided over by Lucrecia Martel has surprised just about everyone.

By David Hudson

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Other Arts, Other Worlds

Did You See This?

Other Arts, Other Worlds

This week we revisit the work of the late critic Gilberto Perez, novelist W. G. Sebald, and filmmakers Alice Guy Blaché, Wong Kar-wai, and Agnès Varda.

By David Hudson

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New Film Comment, Cineaste, Nang
New Film Comment, Cineaste, Nang

In Nang, young writers celebrate Asian cinema in honor of Alexis Tioseco and Nika Bohinc, and new issues of other titles offer fresh reviews and interviews.

By David Hudson

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Todd Phillips’s Joker
Todd Phillips’s Joker

Critics split three ways: Joker is just plain great, or great but dangerous, or dangerous and also really quite bad.

By David Hudson

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Roy Andersson’s About Endlessness
Roy Andersson’s About Endlessness

Fans of the Swedish director will know what to expect, but he seems to be taking his unique vision in a slightly new direction.

By David Hudson

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Death’s Angel: Peter Fonda in Easy Rider

Performances

Death’s Angel: Peter Fonda in Easy Rider

The late actor became an icon of his generation with this moody, brilliant non-performance, informed by his intimate knowledge of chaos and death.

By Chuck Stephens

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A Constant Becoming
A Constant Becoming

With their novelistic density and sexual openness, the films of French master André Téchiné introduced director Stephen Cone to a strange new world of contradictions.

By Stephen Cone

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David Michôd’s The King
David Michôd’s The King

After Laurence Olivier and Kenneth Branagh, it’s Timothée Chalamet’s turn to lead the English to the Battle of Agincourt.

By David Hudson

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Roman Polanski’s An Officer and a Spy
Roman Polanski’s An Officer and a Spy

Early verdicts diverge as widely as opinions on how to respond to the very idea of a new film by Roman Polanski.

By David Hudson

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James Gray’s Ad Astra
James Gray’s Ad Astra

Early reviews of Gray’s space odyssey are strong—and even stronger for Brad Pitt.

By David Hudson

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Bitter Harvest

Dark Passages

Bitter Harvest

Three noirs from 1949 plough up the dark underbelly of agriculture, exploring the corrupt system that puts food on our tables.

By Imogen Sara Smith

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Cléo from 2013 to 2019

Did You See This?

Cléo from 2013 to 2019

This week, a feminist journal folds, a filmmaker pens a manifesto, and Richard Linklater commits to a twenty-year project.

By David Hudson

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The Flavor of Green Tea over Rice: Acquired Tastes
The Flavor of Green Tea over Rice: Acquired Tastes

Class tensions in postwar Japan unsettle the domestic life of a middle-aged couple in this sweetly satirical marriage comedy from Yasujiro Ozu.

By Junji Yoshida

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Hirokazu Kore-eda’s The Truth Opens Venice 2019
Hirokazu Kore-eda’s The Truth Opens Venice 2019

Catherine Deneuve and Juliette Binoche star as a mother and daughter clashing over contrasting versions of their past.

By David Hudson

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A Few Riffs for Penny
A Few Riffs for Penny

The late D. A. Pennebaker once dreamed of being a jazz musician, but he instead found his instrument in a news camera that allowed him to change documentary filmmaking forever.

By Michael Chaiken

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Anticipating the Fall Festivals
Anticipating the Fall Festivals

In the run-up to Venice, Telluride, and Toronto, New York announces its retrospective and revivals.

By David Hudson

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The Koker Trilogy: Journeys of the Heart
The Koker Trilogy: Journeys of the Heart

Paving a path from neorealism to playfully deconstructive postmodernism, Abbas Kiarostami’s suite of village fables explores complex philosophical mysteries through disarmingly simple means.

By Godfrey Cheshire

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