On Film

3470 Results

The War of the Worlds: Sky on Fire
The War of the Worlds: Sky on Fire

The first and most influential film adaptation of H. G. Wells’s sci-fi classic, this brilliantly imagined vision of apocalypse captured American anxieties at the height of the Cold War.

By J. Hoberman

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Ennio Morricone’s Radical Romanticism
Ennio Morricone’s Radical Romanticism

The renowned composer of well over four hundred film scores was equally at home in avant experimentation and tear-jerking sentimentality.

By David Hudson

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Hirokazu Kore-eda’s The Truth
Hirokazu Kore-eda’s The Truth

Kore-eda’s first feature shot outside of Japan also gives us the first pairing of Catherine Deneuve and Juliette Binoche.

By David Hudson

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Form and Function: On the Object Lessons of Summer Hours

One Scene

Form and Function: On the Object Lessons of Summer Hours

Separated from the domestic spaces they once inhabited, two glass vases and a mahogany desk settle into a caged museum life in Olivier Assayas’s deeply felt family portrait.

By Christian Kiefer

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Midsummer Thrills and Spills

Did You See This?

Midsummer Thrills and Spills

A new issue of Cinema Scope, a State of Cinema address from Olivier Assayas, and the Ultimate Summer Movie Showdown are among this week’s highlights.

By David Hudson

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Sounding All the Alarms
Sounding All the Alarms

New issues of photogénie, Comparative Cinema, and SCMS+ take on an array of raging crises.

By David Hudson

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Read and See: Ales Adamovich and Literature out of Fire
Read and See: Ales Adamovich and Literature out of Fire

In postwar Belarus, where documents were either inaccessible or had been destroyed, the cowriter of Come and See pioneered a new form of literature sourced from the nightmarish testimonies of survivors.

By Valzhyna Mort

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Carl Reiner’s Best Life Possible
Carl Reiner’s Best Life Possible

The actor, writer, and director was one of the most beloved comedians of his generation.

By David Hudson

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Alone in There: Marnie Ellen Hertzler on Dirt Daughter
Alone in There: Marnie Ellen Hertzler on Dirt Daughter

The Baltimore-based filmmaker talks with us about her bold exploration of technology, sexuality, and loneliness, now playing on the Criterion Channel.

By Penelope Bartlett

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Come and See: Orphans of the Storm
Come and See: Orphans of the Storm

With extraordinary immediacy, Elem Klimov’s magisterial final film brings to life the barbarity of war, a subject of which the director had firsthand knowledge.

By Mark Le Fanu

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Summer Sparks in Film Quarterly
Summer Sparks in Film Quarterly

The new issue ranges from experimental nonfiction to a Pixar feature, from a ten-screen installation to Watchmen.

By David Hudson

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Five Paths to This Moment

Did You See This?

Five Paths to This Moment

This week’s history-seeped highlights explore queer cinema legacies, black stories on screen, and marketing movies while a pandemic rages.

By David Hudson

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Party Time in Fellini Land

Songbook

Party Time in Fellini Land

In La dolce vita, an upbeat tune by Nino Rota turns a dour party into a feast of ecstatic movement.

By Michael Joshua Rowin

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Joel Schumacher: “There’s Nothing I Would Have Rather Done”
Joel Schumacher: “There’s Nothing I Would Have Rather Done”

It was audiences, not critics, that made hits out of such movies as St. Elmo’s Fire (1985), Batman Forever (1995), and Phone Booth (2002).

By David Hudson

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From the French
From the French

Recent translations include intimate remembrances of Chris Marker and Maurice Pialat.

By David Hudson

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Tokyo Olympiad: The Wind Passing Through the Flagpoles
Tokyo Olympiad: The Wind Passing Through the Flagpoles

Kon Ichikawa aimed to show “the sweat” and “the pathos” of athletic ambition in this monumental documentary, the most extravagant Olympic film to date.

By James Quandt

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Portrait of a Lady on Fire: Daring to See
Portrait of a Lady on Fire: Daring to See

Art becomes a tool for remaking one’s world in this unforgettable depiction of lesbian love, a film that director Céline Sciamma has called “a manifesto about the female gaze.”

By Ela Bittencourt

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Ian Holm: “He Seemed to Tower Under You”
Ian Holm: “He Seemed to Tower Under You”

Heartfelt tributes to the great British actor have been appearing since he passed away on Friday.

By David Hudson

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“Freedom—and Unfreedom”

Did You See This?

“Freedom—and Unfreedom”

Along with Juneteenth and Pride Month viewing suggestions, we’re spotlighting interviews with Euzhan Palcy, Bill Forsyth, the Ross brothers, and more.

By David Hudson

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But I’m a Cheerleader Turns Twenty: Natasha Lyonne and Clea DuVall Reminisce on Their Cult Classic
But I’m a Cheerleader Turns Twenty: Natasha Lyonne and Clea DuVall Reminisce on Their Cult Classic

The stars of Jamie Babbit’s conversion-therapy comedy talk about their on-screen chemistry and their decades-long friendship.

By Hillary Weston

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Coming . . . Eventually
Coming . . . Eventually

James Gray is switching gears, Pablo Larraín is teaming up with Kristen Stewart, and Kirill Serebrennikov is set to take on the life of Andrei Tarkovsky.

By David Hudson

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The Material Worlds of Luther Price
The Material Worlds of Luther Price

At a 2012 screening of work by the late artist and filmmaker, programmer Ed Halter declared: “Luther Price is Brakhage after Punk.”

By David Hudson

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The Cameraman: Man with a Movie Camera
The Cameraman: Man with a Movie Camera

Buster Keaton struggled with higher-ups at MGM while making his last great film, which the studio would later hold up as a model of a perfectly constructed comedy.

By Imogen Sara Smith

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Reshuffling the Calendar
Reshuffling the Calendar

As studios delay the releases of their big summer movies, critics come down hard on the Academy for postponing the Oscars.

By David Hudson

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