• 10 Things I Learned: Persona

    By Abbey Lustgarten

8 comments

  • By Patrick
    April 01, 2014
    08:10 AM

    Terrific stuff! Thank you again.
    Reply
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  • By sara
    April 01, 2014
    01:07 PM

    Thank you Criterion for reminding us about the importance and poetry of these masterpieces
    Reply
  • By Shiladitya Biswas
    April 01, 2014
    01:10 PM

    Thanks for the details. Persona is a masterpiece.
    Reply
  • By Sidney
    April 01, 2014
    05:10 PM

    Incredible material! More great reasons to know why Persona is one of the greatest films ever made.
    Reply
  • By JustinDW
    April 02, 2014
    07:46 AM

    I ordered mine. I'm even more excited for it to arrive now!
    Reply
  • By futurestar
    April 03, 2014
    08:08 PM

    PERSONA is the welcome loss of self into another and no demand to ever retrieve or go back. this film marked a major shift in what kind of films Bergman would make from this point on and most of them demanded sacrifice of in unusual and disconcerting circumstances. he went to extremes to an edge and once there drew comfort and solace while his films punished viewers. welcome to his private abuse.
    Reply
  • By Brandon
    June 14, 2014
    03:43 AM

    It makes me so sad that this fantastic film was out of print until a few months ago. I am forever in debt to you guys.
    Reply
  • By Barry Moore
    July 21, 2014
    09:23 AM

    I saw this interesting but strange and not wholly satisfying film on July 3 of this year, in a screening sponsored by the Austin Film Society, and the brief shot of the erect penis was included in the projected print. I thought that was an unusually audacious element for a film in 1966, and am not surprised to learn that the shot was censored in Britain and the United States. I sense that this film was a highly personal project for Bergman, and is replete with a private mythology that remains arcane and hermetic to most, possibly excepting the director's most diligent followers.
    Reply

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