13 comments

  • By Zach S
    July 30, 2012
    10:59 PM

    So thats how they did that! Great insight!
    Reply
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  • By Craig J. Clark
    July 31, 2012
    09:30 AM

    Years ago, when I saw this for the first time on a UHF station, I couldn't help but notice the way they blurred out all of the figures in the swimming pool mural. Seeing Altman standing next to one of them in the last still, I now know why that was deemed necessary.
    Reply
  • By Austin DeRaedt
    July 31, 2012
    04:31 PM

    hot.
    Reply
  • By Sidney
    July 31, 2012
    05:57 PM

    I love these photos. Gives great meaning to a haunting masterpiece.
    Reply
  • By Christian
    July 31, 2012
    06:28 PM

    In this writer's meaningless opinion, THIS is Altman's masterpiece. Yes, "Nashville" is a very very close second. This movie really lives up to cliche "Every time you watch it, you find something new that will stun the crap out of you." R.I.P. Mr. Altman. Even though when I met you (albeit, very briefly), you were kind of a jerk, you will always be remembered for being a TRUE genius. If you are an Altman fan, and haven't seen this, or waited...The wait needs to end. No more horrible, squeezed, pan & scan. It's not possible for the film to look better than it does now, thanks to Criterion. So, stop putting it off, and BUY it. Don't rent it. This is definitely a Blu-ray worth every penny. Thanks yet again, Criterion.(next title I'm so excited for? "The Game." An under-rated Fincher almost-masterpiece. (Almost? I'm still trying to overlook the last 5 minutes.)
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    • By Kathryn Altman
      July 31, 2012
      07:10 PM

      Please explain "kind of a jerk" -
    • By Matthew D.
      August 05, 2012
      06:02 PM

      Whoa. Did you just offend Robert Altman's wife? Is that what's going on here? Anyway, I share your enthusiasm concerning "3 Women." It's definitely an unforgettable work of art. I also love "McCabe and Mrs. Miller." I've yet to see "Nashville," but I hear terrific things. I would love to see that (and McCabe) come out on blu-ray.
  • By JackDVD78
    July 31, 2012
    11:14 PM

    3 Women was a blind buy DVD purchase when it was first released. When Criterion began upgrading to BLU, this was my ultimate title I wanted in HD. I can't explain it but the film is just a great snapshot of a period in time (before I was even born) that kind of haunts me. 3 Women works on so many levels, that I can't put my thoughts, and feelings into words. It seemed like everyone who worked on the film gave it 100%. I visit the commentary track from Altman more than any other commentary track. the casting was brilliant and Shelly Duvall is really at the top of her game, so nuanced. I really hope more people seek out this film it really is a piece of Americana, possibly no one ever imagining it would have been when it was first released.
    Reply
  • By jeves23
    August 01, 2012
    12:25 PM

    This was a blind purchase on Blu, and frankly I thought it was fantastic (Criterion hasn't steered me wrong yet!). Haunting, mysterious, lyrical, and powerful. It is a strange journey to be sure, but well worth taking. Shelley Duvall is probably one of the oddest screen presences, but she is fascinating to watch (always, but especially here) and Altman seems to know just how to use her.
    Reply
  • By Tom
    August 01, 2012
    11:38 PM

    Bob, put a shirt on.
    Reply
  • By BRAD
    August 02, 2012
    12:42 PM

    I love these pictures. IMO the 70's were the most ambitious period in American filmmaking.
    Reply
  • By Reeniop5
    August 02, 2012
    07:45 PM

    Looking forward to discovering it!
    Reply
  • By MainMan2001
    September 03, 2012
    08:34 PM

    PTA must have modeled Burt Reynolds character in boogie nights off of Altman here. Especially the last photo.
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