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    • Jean-Pierre Léaud takes the spotlight this week in a career-spanning retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. To mark the occasion, Film Comment has republished Olivier Assayas’s 1996 tribute to the French film icon, whom he describes as “at once an actor and an aura.”
    • Another star whose work has spanned multiple generations, Warren Beatty, celebrated his eightieth birthday this week. In tribute to this Hollywood veteran, the BFI looks back on ten of his must-see films, from Bonnie and Clyde and McCabe & Mrs. Miller to Bulworth.
    • The New York Times profiles Beatty’s legendary sister, Shirley MacLaine, whose six decades in the movie industry have made her “a walking compendium of Hollywood lore.”
    • This summer, nonagenarian avant-garde master Jonas Mekas will be going to the Documenta 14 art exhibition in Kassel, Germany, to show a series of photographs he took as a World War II–era refugee.
    • Mekas collaborator Babette Mangolte sat down with MUBI Notebook to discuss her trailblazing work as a cinematographer for Chantal Akerman.
    • Ever dreamed of dressing like a Fassbinder heroine? The latest installment of AnOther Magazine’s Character Study column offers tips on how to re-create the Maria Braun look.
    • For more on fashion, check out the Brattle Theatre’s exploration of how women’s on-screen wardrobes have “inspired far-reaching cultural trends by reflecting or encouraging resilience.”
    • Over at the A.V. Club, Ignatiy Vishnevetsky examines how cinema played a role in cementing Chicago’s reputation as a crime capital.
    • At his peak, Hong Kong crime-film maestro John Woo “didn’t build set pieces—he emptied armories, unleashed firestorms,” writes Nick Pinkerton in an appreciation at Little White Lies.
    • Silent-film fans, rejoice! Twenty-three minutes of a long-lost Louise Brooks film from 1927 have turned up at a Czech archive.
    • And finally, a dose of nostalgia: film writer Mark Caro reminisces on his days as a young cinephile and reconsiders his favorite movie, Harold and Maude.

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