• Criterion Designs:
    Don’t Look Now by Fred Davis

    By Eric Skillman

14 comments

  • By GJ
    April 09, 2015
    03:25 PM

    It's fascinating to see a process such as this one. More posts like this, please!
    Reply
  • By David Spalding
    April 09, 2015
    05:55 PM

    Beautiful designs, all. Well done, Fred!
    Reply
  • By bearcub
    April 09, 2015
    09:26 PM

    All of them are terrible. I've been saying this for years, the art department at this company steals paychecks. Their covers tend to either be awful and/or age AWFULLY bad.
    Reply
    • By David Spalding
      April 14, 2015
      12:28 AM

      Wow, don't hold back. Tell us how you really feel, Eeyore! :D
  • By GregoryT
    April 09, 2015
    10:04 PM

    By Brakhage
    Reply
  • By David Hollingsworth
    April 09, 2015
    10:19 PM

    All of them are beautiful! I especially love the third and fifth designs.
    Reply
  • By mobiusfaith
    April 11, 2015
    03:11 AM

    Clearly the best design was used in my opinion. However, I gotta say that slide 7of8 has me totally mesmerized. A great post. would love to see more things like this on the design process/options.
    Reply
  • By futurestar
    April 11, 2015
    09:25 PM

    Continuation of Criterion Designs which is the best book of any year. Entire history in picture-grams. Great bonus features made this release one of the best blu - rays this year of a great film made back when the industry was shadow boxing an opponent they couldn't quite figure whom/what it would be. Like the raincoat always changing, back here, then gone again, an elusive thought you just can't quite grasp.
    Reply
  • By Kelly W.
    April 12, 2015
    10:10 PM

    I really wish they had done the 5th one, but all of them are great! Stellar movie as well!
    Reply
  • By Godfrey H.
    July 18, 2016
    05:47 PM

    Kinda depressing to read the words 'I had never seen the film' coming from a visual artist. Especially an artist tasked with creating cover art for the release of such a significant movie. After 40+ years' permeating the culture (if not the ongoing zeitgeist), DLN occupies such an essential role in our collective memory that no artist ought readily to admit to ignorance of it, and furthermore Criterion might like to explain why the company consistently comes up with ghastly cover art for beloved movies - for a couple of utter nadirs, take a look at the covers for GREEN FOR DANGER, not to mention each individual cover for the movies collected in the Monsters & Madmen box set. Criterion, pay the rights due and use the original poster artwork. For god's sake. Please.
    Reply
    • By Cezary_C
      July 28, 2016
      10:44 AM

      Nooooo, PLEASE do not use the original poster artwork! While there are some cases where I would prefer the poster artwork, particularly the Czech, Polish, and Russian posters for some international releases, I find Criterion's cover artwork to be wonderful, for the most part. Rosemary's Baby is a great example of the original poster working for the Criterion release, but most posters are made for advertising purposes, and are either designed to recall a different movie that sold well, or to remind people that an actor that they like will appear in the movie and will look sexy.
  • By Peter G.
    July 28, 2016
    03:26 AM

    Stunning cover. Mr. Davis must have spent countless hours of experimentation to come up with these astounding concepts. As with all Criterion packaging, the high standard of design is on par with the high standard of the films they present.
    Reply