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    • It’s been a terrific week for fall film festival news, with the Toronto International Film Festival and the New York Film Festival both unveiling sections of their impressive lineups. Among the TIFF highlights announced so far are the latest films by Werner Herzog, Paul Schrader, and Errol Morris; a selection of new restorations; and a thirtieth anniversary screening of Jonathan Demme’s Something Wild. NYFF’s main slate includes new work by Pedro Almodóvar, James Gray, Jim Jarmusch, and Olivier Assayas.
    • Literary Hub has published the second half of an in-depth conversation between Werner Herzog and Paul Holdengraber.
    • In the New York Times’s By the Book column, writer-actor Amy Schumer discusses her favorite film adaptations, including Robert Altman’s Raymond Carver–inspired Short Cuts, which she names as one of her “top three favorite movies ever.”
    • Speaking of adaptations, over on the Library of America’s biweekly column the Moviegoer, critic Stuart Klawans explores John Huston’s take on Flannery O’Connor’s Wise Blood, a novel that “presents an almost irresistible temptation for a movie director, and an almost insurmountable challenge to go with it.”
    • To celebrate the re-release of David Miller’s newly restored noir thriller Sudden Fear, which opens at New York’s Film Forum today, Sheila O’Malley takes a closer look at Joan Crawford’s superb lead performance.
    • For more on Joan Crawford, check out the latest episode of Karina Longworth’s sensational podcast You Must Remember This.
    • In conjunction with its Almodóvar retrospective, the BFI has posted a list of ten great films set in Madrid, including Carlos Saura’s Los golfos, Victor Erice’s The Quince Tree Sun, and Juan Antonio Bardem’s Death of a Cyclist.
    • “As an actor, he is comfortable in his own skin,” writes Bilge Ebiri in a career-spanning tribute to Jeff Bridges for the Village Voice. “But that languid manner masks an innate restlessness—a questioning, unmoored quality that speaks to a postwar generation that never quite found its place.”
    • Watch Cate Blanchett in the latest Massive Attack music video, directed by Jonah Hillcoat:

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