• This week, we’re presenting something very special on Hulu. For the first time, selections from Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Foundation will be available there. The mission of the foundation is to preserve and present rarely screened films from around the globe, specifically from countries ill-equipped to provide funding for such restorations. Eight of these rescued films will be available for the first time in the U.S., exclusively on Hulu. Watching these rare, newly restored titles is a great way to expand your movie horizons.

    Starting today, we’ll be posting a new WCF title daily, and also including them in our ongoing 101 Days of Summer series, which means that for Hulu Plus nonsubscribers, each film is free (with ads) through August 24. The title for today is Kim Ki-young’s The Housemaid from South Korea; upcoming selections are Djibril Diop Mambéty’s Touki Bouki, from Senegal; Lüfti Ö Akad’s Law of the Border and Metin Erksan’s Dry Summer, both from Turkey; Ahmed El Maanouni’s Trances, from Morocco; Ritwik Ghatak’s A River Called Titas, from India and Bangladesh; Ermek Shinarbaev’s Revenge, from Kazakhstan; and Emilio Gómez Muriel and Fred Zinnemann’s Redes, from Mexico. And remember, if you sign up for Hulu Plus for just $7.99 a month, you can see all of these and the now more than eight hundred other Criterion films streaming there commercial-free, anytime.

    Below, watch a new introduction to these exciting films from Scorsese, the foundation’s chairman.

29 comments

  • By ajyoungen
    August 16, 2013
    01:47 PM

    So, are these movies part of the 101 days promotion or are we getting two uploads a day?
    Reply
  • By Joey
    August 16, 2013
    04:45 PM

    Too bad I'm Canadian...
    Reply
    • By Dan
      August 16, 2013
      05:16 PM

      Joey, That doesn't stop me. ;)
    • By Gord
      August 16, 2013
      09:20 PM

      Me neither.
  • By observer
    August 16, 2013
    05:05 PM

    A River named Titash (not Titas) is one of the pinnacles of Bangladeshi film, filmed in Bangladesh, produced, acted, and staffed by Bangladeshis, one of the first to be made in the country after its tumultuous independence. It's a Bengali film; and not really an Indian film.
    Reply
    • By sami90dpi
      August 19, 2013
      03:07 PM

      U are so right!! This is one of my fav films from my country, Bangladesh! and is by no means Indian by any matter. It is outrageous to ignore a nation's identity while mentioning a great film that is truly made by it's people, shot in the country and speaks the language of Bangla. People do check out the film Meghe Dhaka Tara (The Cloud capped star, 1960) it's my fav by Ritwik Ghatak.
  • By schatterjee06
    August 16, 2013
    06:28 PM

    To the observer: Yeah, don't forget the origin of Bangladesh! You seemed to be offended by the mother country's name!!! And the director was a Bengali Indian (he didn't go back to Bangladesh), so what the heck??? I am just happy that the film got the recognition it deserves!
    Reply
    • By rajdoot
      August 17, 2013
      08:24 PM

      to the indian: whoever he was, the director prefered to direct the movie in bangladesh , so its a bangladeshi movie, the film wouldnt have been same aesthetically if it was based in india. And bangladesh is not a part of india anymore, india is a culturally diverse country, u cant claim india the mother country of bangladesh. we know how indian people are fragmented within themselves.
    • By sami90dpi
      August 19, 2013
      03:21 PM

      Comparing the origins of Bangladesh from India is the same as comparing the origins of India to the long lost Persian empire. In all aspects we have evolved to a new identity, and that too by all means, same as India did. I personally find it extremely offensive this comparison that u have mentioned in the comment, and I do believe i speak for a lot of people when i say that. Bangladesh, the language Bangla, and Bangladeshis have fought and won over an independence, an identity through turmoil and horror. The river mentioned in the film's title itself, Titash is in Bangladesh and the movie is in the point of view from a Bangladeshi's perspetive in their rural lives, the language spoken here is not Kolkata bangla but Bangladeshi bangla. The actors, the crew members everyone is Bangladeshi So how in the name of anything can u sir claim it to be Indian??? please do explain if u will. And I would very much like an apology for your unruly remark about my country.
    • By schatterjee06
      August 19, 2013
      05:22 PM

      What's wrong with you guys? Nobody's claiming it to be an Indian film! Everywhere it has been credited to India/Bangladesh. There has to be a reason for that. The director is Indian, so probably the fund came from India! I am not sure about that though! Why are we arguing about that or getting offended. Ray's The Stanger has been credited to India/France. That's because a French production company might have been involved! Am I getting angry over that being an Indian? I am happy these films are finally making they way towards a bigger audience. I am from Kolkata, my grand father is from now what you call Bangladesh. I hope you know that Kolkata is a city in the state of West Bengal (known as Bengal under undivided India), right? So, you devide the state into two parts - West Bengal and East Bengal, and East Bengali become Bangladesh! I don't understand how am I being offensive to you two by saying India is the mother country? And if you still think I am being offensive, then I am extremely sorry and I apologize to both of you! Let's just be happy that this film is gonna be available soon to us at its best possible quality and one of the finest Indian director Ghatak will enter the collection!
    • By schatterjee06
      August 25, 2013
      09:13 PM

      So my Bangladeshi friends, did you guys see what they have done to the opening sequence of the film, the version which is uploaded on Hulu+? It looks like I am the only person who really care about this! So, the original title sequence has been replaced with a different version which contains the introductory song, but no visual (the river, the boat...)! The Indian DVD and well as the copies available on YouTube do have the sequence! Although I have asked them (Criterion and WCF) on their FB page about this, I still haven't got any reply! Apparently they don't give a damn! They just figured some people will be really happy to see the name Ghatak in the collection! True, because most of the buyers does not have any familiarity with Ghatak films! So, they can sell whatever they want! I will buy it too, when it comes out, I just want to know the reason. Although I am an Indian (not Bangladeshi), but I am just an admirer of Ghatak's each and every film! I will appreciate if you two also try to find out the reason behind it, and if you find something, please don't forget to share it. Thanks.
  • By schatterjee06
    August 16, 2013
    06:30 PM

    Dear Criterion, is there any possibility of other Ritwik Ghatak films entering the collection?
    Reply
  • By Greg
    August 16, 2013
    08:43 PM

    Hope these receive individual releases, on blu-ray.
    Reply
    • By David MacDonald
      August 17, 2013
      08:49 AM

      The logo for them on Hulu is unique to World Cinema Foundation movies ONLY, so there's been speculation that Criterion will be starting a new line just for them (like the Merchant Ivory collection, but for the World Cinema Foundation).
  • By FG
    August 16, 2013
    09:08 PM

    Turkish films,finally!
    Reply
  • By mauricio
    August 16, 2013
    10:01 PM

    this must be free!!! why charge for this treasure
    Reply
    • By TheDaveAbides
      August 16, 2013
      10:09 PM

      "this must be free!!! why charge for this treasure" It is free, if you're not a Hulu+ subscriber, then you'll have to watch commercials. FTA: "Starting today, we’ll be posting a new WCF title daily, and also including them in our ongoing 101 Days of Summer series, which means that for Hulu Plus nonsubscribers, each film is free (with ads) through August 24." I'm gonna have to set aside some time to catch a few of these. This is a very important turn in cinema history; similar to when Criterion came to the marketplace.
  • By Kaurismaki_fan
    August 16, 2013
    10:55 PM

    This means a hope for Edward Yang's A Brighter Summer Day to make its first criterion appearance!!
    Reply
    • By David MacDonald
      August 17, 2013
      08:47 AM

      Yes, but unfortunately not for a while yet. The movies that will be added this week have already been announced, and A Brighter Summer Day wasn't among them.
  • By David MacDonald
    August 17, 2013
    08:46 AM

    Touki Bouki was AMAZING! Thanks for finally making it available!
    Reply
  • By Milo_Mindbender
    August 17, 2013
    02:26 PM

    Would love to see WCF/Criterion do Ann Hui's Boat People. Criterion could use more films directed by women & films from China in the collection and Scorsese promoted Boat People in the early 80s upon its original release.
    Reply
  • By Billy
    August 17, 2013
    06:53 PM

    If only The Housemaid were added to the Criterion Collection. Wishful thinking...
    Reply
  • By Rossco1
    August 17, 2013
    08:26 PM

    too bad i'm in australia !!
    Reply
  • By Rossco1
    August 17, 2013
    08:26 PM

    also, what would film preservation be like without Martin Scorsese !!
    Reply
  • By Luke
    August 18, 2013
    09:09 PM

    I'm in Canada. Also, I hear Hulu has commercials. Boo.
    Reply
    • By Jatarious
      August 19, 2013
      01:17 PM

      Huluplus, movies don't have commercials the free site has commercials on movies though.
  • By schatterjee06
    August 19, 2013
    02:37 PM

    To Rajdoot: Can you please check which country was the source of funding behind the film? I mean which Government or private company funded the filming in Bangladesh! And surely, you are very bad with your history! You have problem with me called India as the mother country??? You know what mother country means, right? Wow...So how was this country originated? You are not saying Bangladesh was there from the very beginning? Are you? Satyajit Ray's The Stranger (1991) has been credited to India and France both by Criterion on their Hulu channel, ask them why? Was it filmed in France?
    Reply
    • By Budhaditya Mazumdar
      January 12, 2014
      07:10 PM

      I agree with schatterjee...the film is a fruit from a director of Indian nationality with distinct Bangladeshi roots and flavors...but yes Bangladesh's origin is from Undivided Bengal in Unpartitioned India so yes India is of course the mother country!
  • By jamiestein
    August 27, 2013
    04:50 PM

    Touki Bouki was such an unexpected delight - touching and hilarious.
    Reply