• [The Daily] Globes: Three Billboards and Lady Bird

    By David Hudson

    Francesm01082018_large


    “If you were dream-casting the role of Golden Globes host for the season of #MeToo and #TimesUp, with black-clad attendees from TV series and films that confronted misogyny (The Handmaid’s Tale) and racism (Get Out) and a barnburner of a speech by a black female icon, you might not have picked the straight white guy,” begins James Poniewozik in the New York Times. “Nor, apparently, would the straight white guy. From his opening line, Seth Meyers hung a light on the dissonance of a man’s being the master of this ceremony: ‘Good evening, ladies and remaining gentlemen.’”

    “What seemed at evening’s start to be a potentially uncomfortable mix—after all, righteous protest is not always a flattering color on well-compensated celebrities—ended up being a surprisingly meaningful ceremony,” finds Time’s Daniel D’Addario. “It was the happiest of surprises: A Golden Globes that seemed put together with real and meaningful thought.”

    But Variety’s Sonia Saraiya argues that “for all of the enthusiasm demonstrated by the red carpet attendees and host Seth Meyers, the awards show itself felt gripped by inexorable forces it still can’t shift. That the women who chose to protest sexual harassment in Hollywood did so by wearing black felt more significant as the night unfolded—it’s a color that blends in and doesn’t make a scene, a color that most of the men were going to wear anyway. Sometimes even the most well-intentioned efforts for progress can be easily subsumed into the grinding gears of an unjust system.”

    On the other hand, also in Variety, Owen Gleiberman: “By the time Oprah got up on stage to make her statement, she didn’t just add to the theme of harassment and heroism, discrimination and liberation. She took it to the mountaintop. Speaking with fire and fury, she offered a glimpse of a better world, one in which women and men would join forces to be the guardians of decency—and would have each other’s backs. For a few glowing moments, her words transcended the very purpose of the awards. They became the evening’s purpose.”

    At Vulture, Hunter Harris and Jackson McHenry pick out the highs and lows of the evening. Update on this: Also at Vulture, Mark Harris notes that this year there’s been “a lot of political freight for an awards show that, even among awards shows, is known for being devoid of any significance whatsoever: Eighty foreign journalists handing out two dozen Ferrero Rocher–looking statuettes to every movie and TV star they can get to show up, which is, of course, all of them. In the context of the Academy Awards, in the context of honor and prestige, in the context of any possible definition of the word ‘meaning,’ the Golden Globes is an empty vessel. Which, oddly, has made the show the perfect vehicle for Hollywood to let America know what’s on its mind.”

    “Leading the way with four awards,” writes the Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw, “Martin McDonagh’s Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri has become a symbolic billboard itself: the story of a very angry woman with nothing left to lose who demands to know why the bigoted male authorities are doing nothing about rape and murder . . . Greta Gerwig’s autobiographical coming-of-age comedy Lady Bird is a lovely movie and a thoroughly worthy winner of best film (comedy/musical). Saoirse Ronan was also a very worthy winner for best actress (comedy/musical). This outstanding performer has found the ideal role for her complex, demanding screen presence. But this actually highlights the big injustice of the night: no nomination for Greta Gerwig in the best director category.”

    Below is the complete list of nominees with the winners in bold. Links from film titles will take you to roundups of reviews and so on, but where you see links from the winners’ names, those will take you to a story with a bit of background, perhaps a snippet from an acceptance speech, maybe even a video.

    Best Picture – Drama

    Call Me by Your Name
    Dunkirk
    The Post
    The Shape of Water
    Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

    Best Picture – Comedy or Musical

    The Disaster Artist
    Get Out
    The Greatest Showman
    I, Tonya
    Lady Bird

    Best Director – Motion Picture

    Guillermo del Toro, The Shape of Water
    Martin McDonagh, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
    Christopher Nolan, Dunkirk
    Ridley Scott, All The Money in the World
    Steven Spielberg, The Post

    Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

    Jessica Chastain, Molly’s Game
    Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
    Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
    Meryl Streep, The Post
    Michelle Williams, All the Money in the World

    Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

    Judi Dench, Victoria & Abdul
    Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
    Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird
    Emma Stone, Battle of the Sexes
    Helen Mirren, The Leisure Seeker

    Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama

    Timothée Chalamet, Call Me by Your Name
    Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread
    Tom Hanks, The Post
    Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
    Denzel Washington, Roman J. Israel, Esq.

    Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

    Steve Carell, Battle of the Sexes
    Ansel Elgort, Baby Driver
    James Franco, The Disaster Artist
    Hugh Jackman, The Greatest Showman
    Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out

    Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture

    Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
    Hong Chau, Downsizing
    Allison Janney, I, Tonya
    Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird
    Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water

    Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture

    Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
    Armie Hammer, Call Me by Your Name
    Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water
    Christopher Plummer, All the Money in the World
    Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

    Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

    Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor, The Shape of Water
    Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird
    Liz Hannah and Josh Singer, The Post
    Martin McDonagh, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
    Aaron Sorkin, Molly’s Game

    Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language

    A Fantastic Woman
    First They Killed My Father
    In the Fade
    Loveless
    The Square

    Best Animated Film

    The Boss Baby
    The Breadwinner
    Ferdinand
    Coco
    Loving Vincent

    Best Original Score – Motion Picture

    Carter Burwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
    Alexandre Desplat, The Shape of Water
    Jonny Greenwood, Phantom Thread
    John Williams, The Post
    Hans Zimmer, Dunkirk

    Best Original Song – Motion Picture

    “Home,” Ferdinand
    “Mighty River,” Mudbound
    “Remember Me,” Coco
    “The Star,” The Star
    “This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman

    Best Television Series – Drama

    The Crown
    Game of Thrones
    The Handmaid’s Tale
    Stranger Things
    This is Us

    Best Television Series – Comedy

    Black-ish
    The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
    Master of None
    SMILF
    Will & Grace

    Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

    Big Little Lies
    Fargo
    Feud: Bette and Joan
    The Sinner
    Top of the Lake: China Girl

    Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

    Sterling K. Brown, This is Us
    Freddie Highmore, The Good Doctor
    Bob Odenkirk, Better Call Saul
    Liev Schreiber, Ray Donovan
    Jason Bateman, Ozark

    Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

    Robert De Niro, The Wizard of Lies
    Jude Law, The Young Pope
    Kyle MacLachlan, Twin Peaks
    Ewan McGregor, Fargo
    Geoffrey Rush, Genius


    Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

    Alfred Molina, Feud: Bette and Joan
    Alexander Skarsgard, Big Little Lies
    David Thewlis, Fargo
    David Harbour, Stranger Things
    Christian Slater, Mr. Robot

    Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

    Pamela Adlon, Better Things
    Alison Brie, Glow
    Issa Rae, Insecure
    Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
    Frankie Shaw, SMILF

    Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

    Laura Dern, Big Little Lies
    Ann Dowd, The Handmaid’s Tale
    Chrissy Metz, This is Us
    Michelle Pfeiffer, The Wizard of Lies
    Shailene Woodley, Big Little Lies

    Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

    Anthony Anderson, Black-ish
    Aziz Ansari, Master of None
    Kevin Bacon, I Love Dick
    William H. Macy, Shameless
    Eric McCormack, Will and Grace

    Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

    Jessica Biel, The Sinner
    Nicole Kidman, Big Little Lies
    Jessica Lange, Feud: Bette and Joan
    Susan Sarandon, Feud: Bette and Joan
    Reese Witherspoon, Big Little Lies

    Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama

    Caitriona Balfe, Outlander
    Claire Foy, The Crown
    Maggie Gyllenhaal, The Deuce
    Katherine Langford, 13 Reasons Why
    Elisabeth Moss, The Handmaid’s Tale

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2 comments

  • By David Harrington
    January 08, 2018
    12:54 PM

    I would love to see Criterion pick up Lady Bird and Three Billboards!
    Reply
    • By Sean Ramsdell
      January 08, 2018
      06:13 PM

      And McDormand's 2nd Oscar, you betcha