Goings On: NYFF Special Events and More

On Film / The Daily — Aug 29, 2017


New York. The Film Society of Lincoln Center has announced a round of Special Events, added a title to its Retrospective, and rolled out the short films of the Main Slate for the fifty-fifth New York Film Festival (September 28 through October 15).

Special Events will feature the world premieres of three major documentaries: Susan Lacy’s Spielberg, which chronicles the cinema titan’s remarkable career; Jennifer Lebeau’s Trouble No More, a concert film that punctuates rare, recently rediscovered footage from Bob Dylan’s ’79-’80 tour with a beautiful performance by Michael Shannon; and Susan Froemke’s The Opera House, a history of the Metropolitan Opera and a love letter to the art form that will have a special screening in the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. Claude Lanzmann returns to NYFF with the World Premiere of his four-film series Four Sisters, created from interviews conducted in the 1970s with four Eastern European women who impossibly survived the Holocaust.

Also:

  • A conversation with Kate Winslet, star of the NYFF closing film, Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel
  • A masterclass with cinematographers Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman
  • A new restoration of G. W. Pabst’s Pandora’s Box (1929) with Louise Brooks; image above
  • Film Comment Presents: Sergei Loznitsa’s A Gentle Creature
  • Bruce Weber’s Nice Girls Don’t Stay for Breakfast, a black-and-white portrait of Robert Mitchum shot on 35 mm in the late 1990s
  • Shorts by, among others, Kazik Radwanski and Pacho Velez and Yoni Brook

With Erotic City on at the Quad, Flavorwire’s Jason Bailey writes about the late Radley Metzger’s The Private Afternoons of Pamela Mann (1974), Naked Came the Stranger (1975), and The Opening of Misty Beethoven (1976).

MoMA’s 3-D Funhouse: Recent Restorations from the 3-D Film Archive opens on Friday and runs through September 10.

This weekend, the Museum of the Moving Image is presenting a Jerry Lewis Tribute: Two Masterpieces by the Total Filmmaker. The Ladies Man (1961) screens on Saturday, The Nutty Professor (1963) on Sunday.

Los Angeles. Ishiro Honda’s Frankenstein Conquers the World (1965) and War of the Gargantuas (1966) “put forth what was the most radical reworking of the Frankenstein mythos in cinema up to their time,” writes Tim Lucas for the New Beverly. “The Frankenstein in Conquers is, appropriately to the character’s history, a tragic figure, a representative of the numerous orphaned children who survived the bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and then had to survive on the prey and refuse of those pulverized cities. The conflict his existence arouses between Japan’s administrators of science and war is not only carried over to the second film, but mirrored and expanded upon by the Yin/Yang conflicts between the two Gargantuas, whose relationship is like that of an emotionally wounded but responsible child taking parental charge of a violent, psychotic sibling.” Friday and Saturday at the New Beverly.

“All of [Warren Beatty’s] considerable talents would coalesce in Heaven Can Wait [1978],” writes Garret Mathany for the New Beverly, “making audiences look at love, death and destiny in a way few rom-coms have achieved with such skill.” More from Kim Morgan: “Life is so loony that the afterlife is loony as well.”

Acropolis Cinema presents Cristi Puiu’s Sieranevada (2016) on Saturday at the Downtown Independent.

Austin. A week-long run for the new 4k restoration of Dario Argento’s Suspiria (1977) starts Friday at the AFS Cinema, where the series Love and Anarchy: The Films of Lina Wertmüller will run through September 24.

Cambridge. Night of the Vampire is an all-night marathon happening from Saturday to Sunday at the Harvard Film Archive.

Paris. The Cinémathèque française’s Milos Forman retrospective is on from Thursday through September 17.

Berlin. Starting Friday, and throughout September, the Arsenal presents Anatomy of Loneliness – The Films of Tsai Ming-liang.

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