Preston Sturges

The Lady Eve

The Lady Eve

A conniving father and daughter meet up with the heir to a brewery fortune—a wealthy but naïve snake enthusiast—and attempt to bamboozle him at a cruise ship card table. Their plan is quickly abandoned when the daughter falls in love with their prey. But when the heir gets wise to her gold-digging ways, she must plot to re-conquer his heart. One of Sturges's most clever and beloved romantic comedies, The Lady Eve balances broad slapstick and sophisticated sexiness with perfect grace.

Film Info

  • Preston Sturges
  • United States
  • 1941
  • 93 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  • Spine #103

Special Features

  • Sparkling new digital transfer
  • Audio commentary by noted film scholar Marian Keane
  • Video introduction by writer-director Peter Bogdanovich
  • The 1942 broadcast of the Lux Radio Theatre adaptation, performed by Barbara Stanwyck and Ray Milland
  • Edith Head costume designs
  • Scrapbook of original publicity materials and production stills
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hearing impaired
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition

Cover based on a theatrical poster

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • Sparkling new digital transfer
  • Audio commentary by noted film scholar Marian Keane
  • Video introduction by writer-director Peter Bogdanovich
  • The 1942 broadcast of the Lux Radio Theatre adaptation, performed by Barbara Stanwyck and Ray Milland
  • Edith Head costume designs
  • Scrapbook of original publicity materials and production stills
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hearing impaired
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition

Cover based on a theatrical poster

The Lady Eve
Cast
Barbara Stanwyck
Jean
Henry Fonda
Charles
Charles Coburn
"Colonel" Harrington
Eugene Pallette
Mr. Pike
William Demarest
Muggsy
Eric Blore
Sir Alfred McGlennan Keith
Melville Cooper
Gerald
Martha O'Driscoll
Martha
Janet Beecher
Mrs. Pike
Credits
Director
Preston Sturges
Written and directed by
Preston Sturges
Producer
Paul Jones
Based on a story by
Monckton Hoffe
Sound
Harry Lindgren
Sound
Don Johnson
Costumes
Edith Head
Editing
Stuart Gilmore
Musical director
Sigmund Krumgold
Art direction
Hans Dreier
Art direction
Ernst Fegté
Cinematography
Victor Milner

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Victor Milner

Cinematographer

Victor Milner
Victor Milner

Though he may not be so well known today, cinematographer Victor Milner was a force during Hollywood’s golden age. Equally adept at the intimate and the epic, he lent visual character to both drawing-room comedies and picturesque outdoor westerns, and the list of directors he collaborated with reads like a who’s who of cinematic legends: Cecil B. DeMille, Victor Fleming, Ernst Lubitsch, Anthony Mann, Preston Sturges, Raoul Walsh, William Wellman, William Wyler. He was also one of the founding members of the prestigious, still active organization the American Society of Cinematographers, and served as its president from 1937 to 1939. Milner started his career in movies as a projectionist and a newsreel cameraman, and ended it as a nine-time Oscar nominee—and onetime winner, for DeMille’s 1934 megaproduction Cleopatra. His final nod from the Academy came for his stunning, psychologically acute vistas in Anthony Mann’s western The Furies.