Preston Sturges

The Palm Beach Story

The Palm Beach Story

This wild tale of wacky wedlock from Preston Sturges takes off like a rocket and never lets up. Joel McCrea and Claudette Colbert play Tom and Gerry, a married New York couple on the skids, financially and romantically. With Tom hot on her trail, Gerry takes off for Florida on a mission to solve the pair’s money troubles, which she accomplishes in a highly unorthodox manner. A mix of the witty and the utterly absurd, The Palm Beach Story is a high watermark of Sturges’s brand of physical comedy and verbal repartee, featuring sparkling performances from its leads as well as hilarious supporting turns from Rudy Vallee and Mary Astor as a brother and a sister ensnared in Tom and Gerry’s high jinks.

Film Info

  • Preston Sturges
  • United States
  • 1942
  • 88 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.37:1
  • English
  • Spine #742

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • New interview with writer and film historian James Harvey about director Preston Sturges
  • New interview with actor and comedian Bill Hader about Sturges
  • Safeguarding Military Information, a 1941 World War II propaganda short written by Sturges
  • Screen Guild Theater radio adaptation of the film from March 1943
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Stephanie Zacharek

New cover by Maurice Vellekoop

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • New interview with writer and film historian James Harvey about director Preston Sturges
  • New interview with actor and comedian Bill Hader about Sturges
  • Safeguarding Military Information, a 1941 World War II propaganda short written by Sturges
  • Screen Guild Theater radio adaptation of the film from March 1943
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Stephanie Zacharek

New cover by Maurice Vellekoop

The Palm Beach Story
Cast
Claudette Colbert
Gerry Jeffers
Joel McCrea
Tom Jeffers
Mary Astor
The Princess Centimillia
Rudy Vallee
J.D. Hackensacker III
Robert Warwick
Mr. Hinch
Jimmy Conlin
Mr. Asweld
William Demarest
First member, Ale and Quail Club
Franklin Pangborn
Manager
Arthur Hoyt
Pullman conductor
Alan Bridge
Conductor
Credits
Director
Preston Sturges
Director of photography
Victor Milner
Music
Victor Young
Art direction
Hans Dreier
Art direction
Ernst Fegté
Editor
Stuart Gilmore
Ms. Colbert’s gowns by
Irene
Makeup artist
Wally Westmore
Sound
Harry Lindgren
Sound
Walter Oberst

From The Current

Three Reasons: The Palm Beach Story
The Palm Beach Story: Love in a Warm Climate
The Palm Beach Story: Love in a Warm Climate

Money can’t buy love and happiness in Preston Sturges’s classic comedy—or can it?

By Stephanie Zacharek

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Victor Milner

Cinematographer

Victor Milner
Victor Milner

Though he may not be so well known today, cinematographer Victor Milner was a force during Hollywood’s golden age. Equally adept at the intimate and the epic, he lent visual character to both drawing-room comedies and picturesque outdoor westerns, and the list of directors he collaborated with reads like a who’s who of cinematic legends: Cecil B. DeMille, Victor Fleming, Ernst Lubitsch, Anthony Mann, Preston Sturges, Raoul Walsh, William Wellman, William Wyler. He was also one of the founding members of the prestigious, still active organization the American Society of Cinematographers, and served as its president from 1937 to 1939. Milner started his career in movies as a projectionist and a newsreel cameraman, and ended it as a nine-time Oscar nominee—and onetime winner, for DeMille’s 1934 megaproduction Cleopatra. His final nod from the Academy came for his stunning, psychologically acute vistas in Anthony Mann’s western The Furies.