Federico Fellini

Amarcord

Amarcord

This carnivalesque portrait of provincial Italy during the fascist period, the most personal film by Federico Fellini, satirizes the director’s youth and turns daily life into a circus of social rituals, adolescent desires, male fantasies, and political subterfuge, all set to Nino Rota’s classic, nostalgia-tinged score. The Academy Award–winning Amarcord remains one of cinema’s enduring treasures.

Film Info

Special Features

  • Restored high-definition digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Audio commentary by film scholars Peter Brunette and Frank Burke
  • American release trailer
  • Deleted scene
  • Fellini’s Homecoming, a forty-five-minute documentary on the complicated relationship between the celebrated director, his hometown, and his past
  • Interview with star Magali Noël
  • Fellini’s drawings of characters in the film
  • Felliniana, a presentation of ephemera devoted to Amarcord, from the collection of Don Young
  • Archival audio interviews of Fellini and his friends and family, by critic Gideon Bachmann
  • Restoration demonstration
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack (Blu-ray only)
  • PLUS: An essay by scholar Sam Rohdie, author of Fellini Lexicon, and Fellini’s 1967 essay “My Rimini” (Blu-ray only)
    Cover illustration by Caitlin Kuhwald, design by Eric Skillman

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • Restored high-definition digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Audio commentary by film scholars Peter Brunette and Frank Burke
  • American release trailer
  • Deleted scene
  • Fellini’s Homecoming, a forty-five-minute documentary on the complicated relationship between the celebrated director, his hometown, and his past
  • Interview with star Magali Noël
  • Fellini’s drawings of characters in the film
  • Felliniana, a presentation of ephemera devoted to Amarcord, from the collection of Don Young
  • Archival audio interviews of Fellini and his friends and family, by critic Gideon Bachmann
  • Restoration demonstration
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack (Blu-ray only)
  • PLUS: An essay by scholar Sam Rohdie, author of Fellini Lexicon, and Fellini’s 1967 essay “My Rimini” (Blu-ray only)
    Cover illustration by Caitlin Kuhwald, design by Eric Skillman
Amarcord
Cast
Pupella Maggio
Titta's mother
Armando Brancia
Titta's father
Magali Noël
Gradisca
Ciccio Ingrassia
Uncle Teo
Nando Orfei
Uncle Lallo
Luigi Rossi
Lawyer
Bruno Zanin
Titta
Gianfilippo Carcano
Don Baravelli
Josiane Tanzilli
Volpina
Maria Antonietta Beluzzi
Tobacconist
Giuseppe Ianigro
Titta's grandfather
Ferruccio Brembilla
Fascist leader
Credits
Director
Federico Fellini
Story and screenplay by
Federico Fellini
Story and screenplay by
Tonino Guerra
Production design and costumes by
Danilo Donati
Cinematography by
Giuseppe Rotunno
Music
Nino Rota
Edited by
Ruggero Mastroianni

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Explore

Federico Fellini

Writer, Director

Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini

One of Italy’s great modern directors, Federico Fellini was a larger-than-life maestro who created an inimitable cinematic style combining surreal carnival with incisive social critique. While his most popular—and accessible—film, the darkly nostalgic childhood memoir Amarcord, is a great entryway into his oeuvre, , a collage of memories, dreams, and fantasies about a director’s artistic crisis, is perhaps his masterpiece. In his early career, Fellini was both a screenwriter for neorealist pioneer Roberto Rossellini and a newspaper caricaturist in postwar Rome, competing influences he would bring together with startling results. After such early works as I vitelloni, Fellini broke away from neorealism’s political strictures with the beloved La strada, and from there boldly explored his obsessions with the circus, societal decadence, spiritual redemption, and, most controversially, women, in such films as Nights of Cabiria, Juliet of the Spirits, and And the Ship Sails On.