Roberto Rossellini

The Flowers of St. Francis

The Flowers of St. Francis

In a series of simple and joyous vignettes, director Roberto Rossellini and co-writer Federico Fellini lovingly convey the universal teachings of the People’s Saint: humility, compassion, faith, and sacrifice. Gorgeously photographed to evoke the medieval paintings of Saint Francis’s time, and cast with monks from the Nocera Inferiore Monastery, The Flowers of St. Francis is a timeless and moving portrait of the search for spiritual enlightenment.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Exclusive new video interviews, conducted in 2004, with actress Isabella Rossellini, film historian Adriano Aprà, and film critic Father Virgilio Fantuzzi
  • The American-release prologue, situating the film in its historical context through paintings and frescoes
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus: a 36-page booklet featuring a new essay by film scholar Peter Brunette and reprinted writings by Roberto Rossellini and critic André Bazin New cover by Sarah Habibi

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Exclusive new video interviews, conducted in 2004, with actress Isabella Rossellini, film historian Adriano Aprà, and film critic Father Virgilio Fantuzzi
  • The American-release prologue, situating the film in its historical context through paintings and frescoes
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus: a 36-page booklet featuring a new essay by film scholar Peter Brunette and reprinted writings by Roberto Rossellini and critic André Bazin New cover by Sarah Habibi
The Flowers of St. Francis
Cast
Brother Nazario Gerardi
Saint Francis
Brother Severino Pisacane
Brother Ginepro
Esposito Bonaventura
Giovanni
Aldo Fabrizi
Nicolaio the Tyrant
Arabella Lemaître
Saint Clare
Brother Nazareno
Franciscan brothers
Brother Raffaele
Brother Robert Sorrentino
Credits
Director
Roberto Rossellini
Screenplay
Roberto Rossellini
Screenplay
Federico Fellini
Screenplay
Father Antonio Lisandrini
Screenplay
Father Felix Morlion
Producer
Angelo Rizzoli
Associate producer
Giuseppe Amato
Cinematography
Otello Martelli
Camera
Luciano Trasatti
Music
Renzo Rossellini
Music (liturgical chants)
Father Enrico Buondonno
Sound
Eraldo Giordani
Sound
Raffaele Del Monte
Editing
Jolanda Benvenuti
Production design
Virgilio Marchi
Costume design
Marina Arcangeli
Costume design
Ditta Peruzzi

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Explore

Roberto Rossellini

Writer, Director

A founder of Italian neorealism, Roberto Rossellini brought to filmmaking a documentary-like authenticity and a philosophical stringency. After making films under Mussolini’s fascist regime early in his career, Rossellini broke out with Rome Open City, a shattering and vivid chronicle of the Nazi occupation of Italy’s capital, followed by Paisan and Germany Year Zero, which round out his “war trilogy.” Rossellini’s adulterous affair with Ingrid Bergman led to the biggest controversy of his career (they were both condemned by the United States Senate) but also to another trilogy—Stromboli, Europa ’51, and Voyage to Italy, all starring Bergman and all about spiritual crises; they were dismissed at the time of their release but are widely praised now. Through the 1950s, Rossellini experimented with different forms, offering an ascetic religious film (The Flowers of St. Francis), a documentary about India (India), and a wartime melodrama that was one of his biggest hits (Il Generale Della Rovere). In the final phase of his career, after calling a news conference and announcing, “Cinema is dead,” Rossellini turned to historical television dramas about major subjects and figures (Louis XIV, Blaise Pascal, Descartes, the Medicis), made with a rational, almost scientific approach. As always, he yearned to show life’s minutiae unadorned, bare and pure. Echoes of Rossellini’s approach to filmmaking are still felt in movements around the world, from China to Iran to South America to the United States. It’s fair to say modern cinema wouldn’t exist as we know it without him.