Roberto Rossellini

Stromboli

Stromboli

The first collaboration between Roberto Rossellini and Ingrid Bergman is a devastating portrait of a woman’s existential crisis, set against the beautiful and forbidding backdrop of a volcanic island. After World War II, a Lithuanian refugee (Bergman) marries a simple Italian fisherman (Mario Vitale) she meets in a prisoner of war camp and accompanies him back to his isolated village on an island off the coast of Sicily. Cut off from the world, she finds herself crumbling emotionally, but she is destined for a dramatic epiphany. Balancing the director’s trademark neorealism—exemplified here in a remarkable depiction of the fishermen’s lives and work—with deeply felt melodrama, Stromboli is a revelation.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration of the English-language version, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • New 2K digital restoration of the Italian-language version, Stromboli terra di Dio, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Introduction by director Roberto Rossellini
  • New interview with film critic Adriano Aprà
  • Rossellini Under the Volcano, a 1998 documentary that returns to Stromboli fifty years after the making of the film
  • Surprised by Death, a new visual essay by film critic James Quandt on the historical and artistic themes of the trilogy (DVD)
  • Rossellini Through His Own Eyes, a 1992 documentary on the director’s approach to cinema, featuring archival interviews with Rossellini and actress Ingrid Bergman (DVD)
  • New English subtitle translation

Available In

Collector's Set

3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman

3 Films by Rossellini Starring Bergman

Blu-Ray Box Set

4 Discs

$79.96

Collector's Set

3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman

3 Films by Rossellini Starring Bergman

DVD Box Set

5 Discs

$79.96

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration of the English-language version, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • New 2K digital restoration of the Italian-language version, Stromboli terra di Dio, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Introduction by director Roberto Rossellini
  • New interview with film critic Adriano Aprà
  • Rossellini Under the Volcano, a 1998 documentary that returns to Stromboli fifty years after the making of the film
  • Surprised by Death, a new visual essay by film critic James Quandt on the historical and artistic themes of the trilogy (DVD)
  • Rossellini Through His Own Eyes, a 1992 documentary on the director’s approach to cinema, featuring archival interviews with Rossellini and actress Ingrid Bergman (DVD)
  • New English subtitle translation
Stromboli
Cast
Ingrid Bergman
Karin
Mario Vitale
Antonio
Renzo Cesana
Priest
Mario Sponza
Lighthouse keeper
Credits
Director
Roberto Rossellini
Produced by
Roberto Rossellini
Story
Roberto Rossellini
Screenplay
Sergio Amidei
Screenplay
G. P. Callegari
Screenplay
Art Cohn
Screenplay
Renzo Cesana
Religious theme inspired by
Father Félix Morlion, OP
Cinematography
Otello Martelli
Editing
Iolanda Benvenuti
Music
Renzo Rossellini
Musical director
C. Bakaleinikoff
Sound
Terry Kellum
Sound
E. Giordani

From The Current

Ingrid Bergman’s Stromboli Home Movies
Ingrid Bergman’s Stromboli Home Movies

It was on the set of Stromboli that director Roberto Rossellini and star Ingrid Bergman, collaborating on their first film, fell in love. In these rarely seen 8 mm color home movies, shot with Bergman’s own camera (most of it by herself, but you…

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Martin Scorsese on Roberto Rossellini
Martin Scorsese on Roberto Rossellini

By the time Roberto Rossellini joined forces with the international superstar Ingrid Bergman in the late 1940s, he had already left an indelible mark on the history of film with his groundbreaking works of neorealism, including Rome Open City, Paisan…

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Modern Marriage on Stromboli
Modern Marriage on Stromboli

Marketed as a movie of volcanic passion, Roberto Rossellini’s first film with Ingrid Bergman is rather a pragmatic take on the negotiations of matrimony.

By Dina Iordanova

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Living in Cinema: Rossellini and Bergman in Italy
Living in Cinema: Rossellini and Bergman in Italy

The neorealist master and the Hollywood icon forged a brilliant artistic path together, despite the backlash their controversial romance generated.

By Richard Brody

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From the Rossellini Archives
From the Rossellini Archives

With his mix of documentary-like immediacy and profound moral inquiry, Roberto Rossellini became a pioneer of Italian neorealism, a movement that transformed the way filmmakers captured the fabric of everyday life and and grappled with the most urgen…

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Rossellini in Texas

Repertory Picks

Rossellini in Texas

Tonight, as part of the month-long series Rossellini: Restored and Revisited, the Austin Film Society in Austin, Texas, will screen Roberto Rossellini’s 1950 existential masterpiece Stromboli. Starring the radiant Ingrid Bergman, the film was the p…

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Happy 100th Birthday, Ingrid Bergman!
Happy 100th Birthday, Ingrid Bergman!

Check out this video tribute to a matchless screen icon that Jonathan Keogh made for us —this weekend marks Ingrid Bergman’s centennial. Here’s lookin’ at you, kid.

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“Ti amo”: An Exchange of Letters
“Ti amo”: An Exchange of Letters

This fascinating first contact between Roberto Rossellini and Ingrid Bergman kicked off one of cinema’s greatest—and most controversial—love affairs.

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Explore

Roberto Rossellini

Writer, Producer, Director

A founder of Italian neorealism, Roberto Rossellini brought to filmmaking a documentary-like authenticity and a philosophical stringency. After making films under Mussolini’s fascist regime early in his career, Rossellini broke out with Rome Open City, a shattering and vivid chronicle of the Nazi occupation of Italy’s capital, followed by Paisan and Germany Year Zero, which round out his “war trilogy.” Rossellini’s adulterous affair with Ingrid Bergman led to the biggest controversy of his career (they were both condemned by the United States Senate) but also to another trilogy—Stromboli, Europa ’51, and Voyage to Italy, all starring Bergman and all about spiritual crises; they were dismissed at the time of their release but are widely praised now. Through the 1950s, Rossellini experimented with different forms, offering an ascetic religious film (The Flowers of St. Francis), a documentary about India (India), and a wartime melodrama that was one of his biggest hits (Il Generale Della Rovere). In the final phase of his career, after calling a news conference and announcing, “Cinema is dead,” Rossellini turned to historical television dramas about major subjects and figures (Louis XIV, Blaise Pascal, Descartes, the Medicis), made with a rational, almost scientific approach. As always, he yearned to show life’s minutiae unadorned, bare and pure. Echoes of Rossellini’s approach to filmmaking are still felt in movements around the world, from China to Iran to South America to the United States. It’s fair to say modern cinema wouldn’t exist as we know it without him.