Roberto Rossellini

Journey to Italy

Journey to Italy

Among the most influential films of the postwar era, Roberto Rossellini’s Journey to Italy (Viaggio in Italia) charts the declining marriage of a couple from England (Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders) on a trip in the countryside near Naples. More than just the anatomy of a relationship, Rossellini’s masterpiece is a heartrending work of emotion and spirituality. Considered a predecessor to the existentialist works of Michelangelo Antonioni and hailed as a groundbreaking modernist work by the legendary film journal Cahiers du cinéma, Journey to Italy is a breathtaking cinematic benchmark.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Introduction by director Roberto Rossellini
  • Audio commentary by film scholar Laura Mulvey
  • New interview with film critic Adriano Aprà
  • Short film featuring footage of the Rossellinis during the production of Journey to Italy
  • New interview with Rossellini and actress Ingrid Bergman’s daughters, Ingrid Rossellini and Isabella Rossellini (Blu-ray)
  • New interview with filmmaker Martin Scorsese
  • Living and Departed, a new visual essay by Rossellini scholar Tag Gallagher on the evolution of the director’s style in the trilogy
  • Surprised by Death, a new visual essay by film critic James Quandt on the historical and artistic themes of the trilogy (Blu-ray)
  • Rossellini Through His Own Eyes, a 1992 documentary on the director’s approach to cinema, featuring archival interviews with Rossellini and Bergman (Blu-ray)
  • Ingrid Bergman Remembered, a 1995 documentary on the actress’s life, narrated by her daughter Pia Lindstrom
  • New interview with G. Fiorella Mariani, Rossellini’s niece, featuring Bergman’s home movies (Blu-ray)
  • My Dad Is 100 Years Old, a 2005 short film directed by Guy Maddin and starring Isabella Rossellini (Blu-ray)
  • The Chicken, a 1952 short film directed by Rossellini and starring Bergman (Blu-ray)

Available In

Collector's Set

3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman

3 Films by Rossellini Starring Bergman

Blu-Ray Box Set

4 Discs

$79.96

Collector's Set

3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman

3 Films by Rossellini Starring Bergman

DVD Box Set

5 Discs

$79.96

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Introduction by director Roberto Rossellini
  • Audio commentary by film scholar Laura Mulvey
  • New interview with film critic Adriano Aprà
  • Short film featuring footage of the Rossellinis during the production of Journey to Italy
  • New interview with Rossellini and actress Ingrid Bergman’s daughters, Ingrid Rossellini and Isabella Rossellini (Blu-ray)
  • New interview with filmmaker Martin Scorsese
  • Living and Departed, a new visual essay by Rossellini scholar Tag Gallagher on the evolution of the director’s style in the trilogy
  • Surprised by Death, a new visual essay by film critic James Quandt on the historical and artistic themes of the trilogy (Blu-ray)
  • Rossellini Through His Own Eyes, a 1992 documentary on the director’s approach to cinema, featuring archival interviews with Rossellini and Bergman (Blu-ray)
  • Ingrid Bergman Remembered, a 1995 documentary on the actress’s life, narrated by her daughter Pia Lindstrom
  • New interview with G. Fiorella Mariani, Rossellini’s niece, featuring Bergman’s home movies (Blu-ray)
  • My Dad Is 100 Years Old, a 2005 short film directed by Guy Maddin and starring Isabella Rossellini (Blu-ray)
  • The Chicken, a 1952 short film directed by Rossellini and starring Bergman (Blu-ray)
Journey to Italy
Cast
Ingrid Bergman
Katherine
George Sanders
Alex
Maria Mauban
Maria
Anna Proclemer
Prostitute
Tony La Penna
Tony
Natalia Ray-La Penna
Natalia
Paul Muller
Paul
Leslie Daniels
Leslie
Jackie Frost
Judy
Credits
Director
Roberto Rossellini
Produced by
Roberto Rossellini
Produced by
Adolfo Fossataro
Produced by
Alfred Guarini
Story and screenplay
Vitaliano Brancati
Story and screenplay
Roberto Rossellini
Cinematography
Enzo Serafin
Music
Renzo Rossellini
Production managers
Mario Del Papa
Production managers
Marcello D’Amico
Edited by
Iolanda Benvenuti
Production design
Piero Filippone

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Explore

Roberto Rossellini

Writer, Producer, Director

A founder of Italian neorealism, Roberto Rossellini brought to filmmaking a documentary-like authenticity and a philosophical stringency. After making films under Mussolini’s fascist regime early in his career, Rossellini broke out with Rome Open City, a shattering and vivid chronicle of the Nazi occupation of Italy’s capital, followed by Paisan and Germany Year Zero, which round out his “war trilogy.” Rossellini’s adulterous affair with Ingrid Bergman led to the biggest controversy of his career (they were both condemned by the United States Senate) but also to another trilogy—Stromboli, Europa ’51, and Voyage to Italy, all starring Bergman and all about spiritual crises; they were dismissed at the time of their release but are widely praised now. Through the 1950s, Rossellini experimented with different forms, offering an ascetic religious film (The Flowers of St. Francis), a documentary about India (India), and a wartime melodrama that was one of his biggest hits (Il Generale Della Rovere). In the final phase of his career, after calling a news conference and announcing, “Cinema is dead,” Rossellini turned to historical television dramas about major subjects and figures (Louis XIV, Blaise Pascal, Descartes, the Medicis), made with a rational, almost scientific approach. As always, he yearned to show life’s minutiae unadorned, bare and pure. Echoes of Rossellini’s approach to filmmaking are still felt in movements around the world, from China to Iran to South America to the United States. It’s fair to say modern cinema wouldn’t exist as we know it without him.