Le samouraï Le samouraï

Le samouraï

Jean-Pierre Melville

 
Le samouraï (Criterion Blu-Ray)

14 Nov 2017

Blu-Ray

1 Disc

SRP: $39.95

Criterion Store price:$31.96

  • France
  • 1967
  • 105 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.85:1
  • French
  •  
  • Spine #306

In a career-defining performance, Alain Delon plays Jef Costello, a contract killer with samurai instincts. After carrying out a flawlessly planned hit, Jef finds himself caught between a persistent police investigator and a ruthless employer, and not even his armor of fedora and trench coat can protect him. An elegantly stylized masterpiece of cool by maverick director Jean‑Pierre Melville, Le samouraï is a razor-sharp cocktail of 1940s American gangster cinema and 1960s French pop culture—with a liberal dose of Japanese lone-warrior mythology.

Cast

Jef CostelloAlain Delon
SuperintendentFrançois Périer
Jane LagrangeNathalie Delon
Valérie, the pianistCathy Rosier
Man in the passagewayJacques Leroy
WienerMichel Boisrond
BartenderRobert Favart
Olivier ReyJean-Pierre Posier
Hatcheck girlCatherine Jourdan
First inspectorRoger Fradet
Second inspectorCarlo Nell
Third inspectorRobert Rondo
MechanicAndré Salgues
DamoliniGeorges Casati
First nightclub clientJean Gold
Second nightclub clientGeorges Billy

Credits

DirectorJean-Pierre Melville
ProducersRaymond Borderie and Eugène Lépicier
ScreenplayJean-Pierre Melville
Director of photographyHenri Decaë
Camera operatorsJean Charvein and Henri Decaë
MusicFrançois de Roubaix
Production designFrançois de Lamothe
Production supervisorGeorges Casati
Assistant directorGeorges Pellegrin
EditorsMonique Bonnot and Yo Maurette
Assistant editorsGeneviève Adam, Madeleine Bagiau, Madeleine Guérin and Geneviève Letellier
Sound supervisorAlex Pront
Sound editorRobert Pouret
Sound engineerRené Longuet
Furniture and accessoriesRobert Christides

Disc Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Interviews from 2005 with Rui Nogueira, editor of Melville on Melville, and Ginette Vincendeau, author of Jean-Pierre Melville: An American in Paris
  • Archival interviews with Melville and actors Alain Delon, François Périer, Nathalie Delon, and Cathy Rosier
  • Melville-Delon: D’honneur et de nuit (2011), a short documentary exploring the friendship between the director and the actor and their iconic collaboration on this film
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: An essay by film scholar David Thomson, an appreciation by filmmaker John Woo, and excerpts from Melville on Melville

Film Essays

Le Samouraï: Death in White Gloves

By David Thomson October 24, 2005

Tone and style are everything with Le samouraï. Poised on the brink of absurdity, or a kind of attitudinizing male arrogance, Jean-Pierre Melville’s great film flirts with that macho extremism . . . Read more »

Features

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Dark Passages: The Beautiful Crimes of Henri Decaë

By Imogen Sara Smith October 03, 2017

In her latest column, critic Imogen Sara Smith explains how cinematographer Henri Decaë brought a risk-taking spirit and seductive allure to some of the most iconic French crime films. Read more »


On Five

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From the Melville Archives

October 20, 2016

Today, we’re celebrating what would have been Jean-Pierre Melville’s ninety-ninth birthday. In a filmography that ranges from psychosexual dramas and bracing chronicles of the French Resistance . . . Read more »


Features

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Dark Passages: What’s in a Name

By Imogen Sara Smith September 20, 2016

If you consider noir as a global phenomenon, then films like Julien Duvivier’s Pépé le moko (1937), Jean Renoir’s La bête humaine (1938), and Carné’s Port of Shadows (1938) may be the first full . . . Read more »


Photo Galleries

Happy Birthday, Handsome

November 08, 2013


Photo Galleries


Film Essays

Le Samouraï: Death in White Gloves

By David Thomson October 24, 2005

Tone and style are everything with Le samouraï. Poised on the brink of absurdity, or a kind of attitudinizing male arrogance, Jean-Pierre Melville’s great film flirts with that macho extremism . . . Read more »

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