Jean-Luc Godard

Every Man for Himself

Every Man for Himself

After a decade in the wilds of avant-garde and early video experimentation, Jean-Luc Godard returned to commercial cinema with this star-driven work of social commentary, while remaining defiantly intellectual and formally cutting-edge. Every Man for Himself, featuring a script by Jean-Claude Carrière and Anne-Marie Miéville, looks at the sexual and professional lives of three people—a television director (Jacques Dutronc), his ex-girlfriend (Nathalie Baye), and a prostitute (Isabelle Huppert)—to create a meditative story about work, relationships, and the notion of freedom. Made twenty years into his career, it was, Godard said, his “second first film.”

Film Info

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Scénario de “Sauve qui peut (la vie)” (1979), a short video created by director Jean-Luc Godard to secure financing for Every Man for Himself
  • New video essay by critic Colin MacCabe
  • New interviews with actor Isabelle Huppert and producer Marin Karmitz
  • Archival interviews with actor Nathalie Baye, cinematographers Renato Berta and William Lubtchansky, and composer Gabriel Yared
  • Two back-to-back 1980 appearances by Godard on The Dick Cavett Show
  • Godard 1980, a short film by Jon Jost, Donald Ranvaud, and Peter Wollen, featuring Godard
  • Trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Amy Taubin

New cover by Fred Davis

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Scénario de “Sauve qui peut (la vie)” (1979), a short video created by director Jean-Luc Godard to secure financing for Every Man for Himself
  • New video essay by critic Colin MacCabe
  • New interviews with actor Isabelle Huppert and producer Marin Karmitz
  • Archival interviews with actor Nathalie Baye, cinematographers Renato Berta and William Lubtchansky, and composer Gabriel Yared
  • Two back-to-back 1980 appearances by Godard on The Dick Cavett Show
  • Godard 1980, a short film by Jon Jost, Donald Ranvaud, and Peter Wollen, featuring Godard
  • Trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Amy Taubin

New cover by Fred Davis

Every Man for Himself
Cast
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Riviere
Jacques Dutronc
Paul Godard
Nathalie Baye
Denise Rimbaud
Roland Amstutz
Customer in room 522
Anna Baldaccini
Isabelle’s sister
Fred Personne
M. Personne
Dore de Rosa
Hotel attendant
Monique Barscha
Opera singer
Cécile Tanner
Paul’s daughter
Roger Jendly
Customer of Isabelle’s sister
Michel Cassagne
Piaget
Paule Muret
Paul’s ex-wife
Marguerite Duras
as herself (audio)
Catherine Freiburghaus
Farm girl
Gérard Battaz
Motorcyclist
Serge Maillard
Coach
Erik Desfosses
Cinema guy
Nicole Wicht
Isabelle’s friend
Michèle Gleizer
Woman in café
Credits
Director
Jean-Luc Godard
Producers
Alain Sarde
Producers
Jean-Luc Godard
Associate producer
Marin Karmitz
Screenplay
Anne-Marie Miéville
Screenplay
Jean-Claude Carrière
Editors
Anne-Marie Miéville
Editors
Jean-Luc Godard
Cinematographers
William Lubtchansky
Cinematographers
Renato Berta
Cinematographers
Jean-Bernard Menoud
Art director
Romain Goupil
Production managers
Miguel Stucky
Production managers
Franci Camus
Production managers
Josiane Morand
Lighting
Daniel Bernard
Sound
Oscar Stellavox
Sound
Jacques Maumont
Sound
Luc Yersin
Composer
Gabriel Yared
Still photographer
Anne-Marie Miéville

From The Current

Isabelle Huppert on Jean-Luc Godard
Isabelle Huppert on Jean-Luc Godard

Isabelle Huppert was a rising star when Jean-Luc Godard cast her in the part of prostitute Isabelle Rivière in his 1980 film Every Man for Himself. In this excerpt from a new interview with Huppert on our release o…

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Illuminations: Godard’s Every Man for Himself
Illuminations: Godard’s Every Man for Himself

The scholar and producer talks about his experiences on the set of a film that changed his life.

By Colin MacCabe

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Every Man for Himself: Themes and Variations
Every Man for Himself: Themes and Variations

Jean-Luc Godard returned to the character-driven intensity of his earlier films with this satirical but serious-minded take on men, women, and money.

By Amy Taubin

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Isabelle Huppert on the Emotional Power of Cinema
Isabelle Huppert on the Emotional Power of Cinema

“Filmmaking is a collective assemblage of desires,” said the incomparable French actor when she sat down to talk with us about the emotional extremity of her characters, her relationship with filmmakers, and the instinctual nature of her acting a

By Hillary Weston

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Revisiting the Cinema of Anne-Marie Miéville
Revisiting the Cinema of Anne-Marie Miéville

Over at the Sight & Sound blog, the BFI has just published an insightful and exhaustive article by Albertine Fox about the brilliant career of Anne-Marie Miéville, the Swiss-born multimedia artist and director of several acclaimed features, incl…

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Explore

Jean-Luc Godard

Producer, Director

A pioneer of the French new wave, Jean-Luc Godard has had an incalculable effect on modern cinema that refuses to wane. Before directing, Godard was an ethnology student and a critic for Cahiers du cinéma, and his approach to filmmaking reflects his interest in how cinematic form intertwines with social reality. His groundbreaking debut feature, Breathless—his first and last mainstream success—is, of course, essential Godard: its strategy of merging high (Mozart) and low (American crime thrillers) culture has been mimicked by generations of filmmakers. As the sixties progressed, Godard’s output became increasingly radical, both aesthetically (A Woman Is a Woman, Contempt, Band of Outsiders) and politically (Masculin féminin, Pierrot le fou), until by 1968 he had forsworn commercial cinema altogether, forming a leftist filmmaking collective (the Dziga Vertov Group) and making such films as Tout va bien. Today Godard remains our greatest lyricist on historical trauma, religion, and the legacy of cinema.