Tout va bien

In 1972, newly radicalized Hollywood star Jane Fonda joined forces with cinematic innovator Jean-Luc Godard and collaborator Jean-Pierre Gorin in an unholy artistic alliance that resulted in Tout va bien (Everything’s All Right). This free-ranging assault on consumer capitalism and the establishment left tells the story of a wildcat strike at a sausage factory as witnessed by an American reporter (Fonda) and her has-been New Wave film director husband (Yves Montand). The Criterion Collection is proud to present this masterpiece of radical cinema, a caustic critique of society, marriage, and revolution in post-1968 France.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Letter to Jane (1972), Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin’s postscript film to Tout va bien
  • 1972 video interview excerpt with Jean-Luc Godard
  • New video interview with Jean-Pierre Gorin
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus: A 40-page booklet including essays by film critics J. Hoberman and Kent Jones and Godard biographer Colin MacCabe and an excerpted interview with Gorin and Godard from 1972

New cover by Neil Kellerhouse

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Letter to Jane (1972), Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin’s postscript film to Tout va bien
  • 1972 video interview excerpt with Jean-Luc Godard
  • New video interview with Jean-Pierre Gorin
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus: A 40-page booklet including essays by film critics J. Hoberman and Kent Jones and Godard biographer Colin MacCabe and an excerpted interview with Gorin and Godard from 1972

New cover by Neil Kellerhouse

Tout va bien
Cast
Yves Montand
He (Jacques)
Jane Fonda
She (Susan)
Vittorio Caprioli
Factory boss
Jean Pignol
CGT delegate
Pierre Oudry
Frédéric
Elisabeth Chauvin
Geneviève
Eric Chartier
Lucien
Yves Gabrieli
Léon
Bugette
Georges
Castel Casti
Jacques
Michel Marot
Communist Party representative
Huguette Miéville
Georgette
Anne Wiazemsky
Leftist
Jean-René Defleurieu
Leftist
Credits
Director
Jean-Luc Godard
Director
Jean-Pierre Gorin
Screenplay
Jean-Luc Godard
Screenplay
Jean-Pierre Gorin
Cinematography
Armand Marco
Camera operators
Yves Agostini
Camera operators
Édouard Burgess
Sound
Antoine Bonfanti
Sound
Bernard Ortion
Editing
Claudine Merlin
Editing
Kenout Peltier
Set designer
Jacques Dugied
Special effects
Jean-Claude Dolbert
Special effects
Paul Trielli
Set photographers
Anne-Marie Michel
Set photographers
Alain Miéville
Production representative
Jean-Pierre Rassam
Administration
Alain Coiffier

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Explore

Jean-Luc Godard

Writer, Director

A pioneer of the French new wave, Jean-Luc Godard has had an incalculable effect on modern cinema that refuses to wane. Before directing, Godard was an ethnology student and a critic for Cahiers du cinéma, and his approach to filmmaking reflects his interest in how cinematic form intertwines with social reality. His groundbreaking debut feature, Breathless—his first and last mainstream success—is, of course, essential Godard: its strategy of merging high (Mozart) and low (American crime thrillers) culture has been mimicked by generations of filmmakers. As the sixties progressed, Godard’s output became increasingly radical, both aesthetically (A Woman Is a Woman, Contempt, Band of Outsiders) and politically (Masculin féminin, Pierrot le fou), until by 1968 he had forsworn commercial cinema altogether, forming a leftist filmmaking collective (the Dziga Vertov Group) and making such films as Tout va bien. Today Godard remains our greatest lyricist on historical trauma, religion, and the legacy of cinema.