Author Spotlight

Colin MacCabe

Colin MacCabe is Distinguished Professor of English and Film at the University of Pittsburgh. His most recent film production is The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger (2015). His collection Perpetual Carnival: Essays on Film and Literature was published in January 2017.

16 Results

A Taste of Honey: Northern Accents
A Taste of Honey: Northern Accents

Tony Richardson’s era-defining exploration of sexuality, race, and working-class life brought a uniquely female perspective to England’s Free Cinema movement.

By Colin MacCabe

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Night and Fog: The Never-Ending Cries
Night and Fog: The Never-Ending Cries

Interweaving wartime footage with haunting images of abandoned concentration camps, Alain Resnais’s breakthrough was one of the first films to confront the ravages of the Holocaust.

By Colin MacCabe

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Cannes Dispatch: Son of Saul
Cannes Dispatch: Son of Saul

It is one of my most strongly held critical beliefs that you should not write about films you don’t like. First, it is bad for the soul to exult in pointing out the deficiencies of the film in question. Second, if you have ever had the luck to prod…

By Colin MacCabe

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Cracking Cannes
Cracking Cannes

Cannes is complicated. To the first-time visitor, it seems a blur of parties, dinners, and screenings, and wherever you are, you are constantly troubled by the thought that the really hot screening or the really hip party is happening elsewhere.


By Colin MacCabe

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Illuminations: Godard’s Every Man for Himself
Illuminations: Godard’s Every Man for Himself

The scholar and producer talks about his experiences on the set of a film that changed his life.

By Colin MacCabe

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Godard at Cannes, Part Two
Godard at Cannes, Part Two

The filmmaker’s latest offering at the film festival reaffirms the author’s faith in him.

By Colin MacCabe

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Godard at Cannes, Part One
Godard at Cannes, Part One

The long relationship between director and festival has never been without its complications.

By Colin MacCabe

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The Truest Tess
The Truest Tess

Roman Polanski’s film is a highly sophisticated adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s classic novel, in both its faithfulness and its divergences.

By Colin MacCabe

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Arabian Nights: Brave Old World
Arabian Nights: Brave Old World

Rejecting the orientalism of other adaptations, Pier Paolo Pasolini’s take on the classic tales is humane and erotic.

By Colin MacCabe

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The Canterbury Tales: Sex and Death
The Canterbury Tales: Sex and Death

Moving to Chaucer’s gray-skied England, Pier Paolo Pasolini pushed his trilogy into darker realms.

By Colin MacCabe

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The Decameron: The Past Is Present
The Decameron: The Past Is Present

With this frenetic cinematic fresco, Pasolini began his Trilogy of Life and its forays into a world as yet unspoiled by capitalism.

By Colin MacCabe

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Three Colors: A Hymn to European Cinema
Three Colors: A Hymn to European Cinema

In 1989, the Communist rule that had dominated Eastern Europe since the end of the Second World War collapsed with astonishing rapidity. If the long-term political, economic, and ideological consequences of Europe’s reunification are still unfoldin…

By Colin MacCabe

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Carlos: Sudden Death
Carlos: Sudden Death

Toward the end of Olivier Assayas's Carlos, a young French diplomat's wife goes to answer the door of their flat in Beirut and is greeted by a huge bunch of flowers—which immediately disappears to reveal a gun that shoots her in the middle of the f…

By Colin MacCabe

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Paisan: More Real Than Real
Paisan: More Real Than Real

Roberto Rossellini’s second postwar film was released in the United States as Paisan, and one can understand why the distributors wanted to use a title familiar to many Americans as meaning “friend” or “countryman” for a work that is at roo…

By Colin MacCabe

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The Taking of Power by Louis XIV:Long Live the Cinema!
The Taking of Power by Louis XIV:
Long Live the Cinema!

In 1962, Roberto Rossellini called a press conference in a bookshop in Rome and announced that the cinema was dead. “There’s a crisis not just in film but culture as a whole,” he explained. Increasingly, Rossellini had understood the great task…

By Colin MacCabe

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Bazin Season

André Bazin has a curious status in intellectual life. He is everywhere admitted as the founding father of film criticism and theory in general. The magazine he created in the 1950s, Cahiers du cinéma, has good claim to be the most influential film…

By Colin MacCabe