• Forty years ago today, we lost Pier Paolo Pasolini—the celebrated Italian filmmaker, actor, poet, novelist, journalist, playwright, painter, and public intellectual. On November 2, 1975, Pasolini was found brutally murdered on a beach in Ostia, Italy, just weeks before the scheduled premiere of his final work, Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom. (A young man was convicted of the killing, but the case remains in dispute.) Pasolini, whose leftist beliefs and homosexuality made him a controversial figure in his time, is now considered one of cinema's most challenging and complex artists. Today, the reminder of his mysterious, all-too-sudden death offers a moment for bittersweet reflection on the brilliant mind behind such films as Mamma Roma, The Decameron, Trilogy of Life, and many more masterpieces.

    To commemorate the anniversary of Pasolini's death, the French distributor Carlotta Films has released a video compilation of snippets from some of his unforgettable cinema contributions. Additionally, from November 4 to 22, Pasolini fans in Istanbul will have the opportunity to view an extensive lineup of the auteur's work at the Pera Museum, which is teaming up with the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs to present a retrospective of Pasolini’s films.

7 comments

  • By MartinDelCarpio
    November 02, 2015
    05:33 PM

    I'm waiting for the day for Criterion to get their hands on Teorema.
    Reply
  • By David Kelly
    November 02, 2015
    05:40 PM

    I found it fascinating when I read an interview with Ninetto Davoli a while back, and he stated that he doesn't believe all of the conspiracies or suspicions about Pasolini's death. After all these years and all the debate, the guy who probably knew Pasolini better than anyone states that he believes it happened exactly as described. He says Pasolini was NOT suicidal, or looking to get killed. Nor does he believe it was some orchestrated political hit. He says he believes that Pier Paolo simply happened upon a bad situation. He picked up the wrong hustler, they disagreed, they fought, and that Pasolini's death was merely a heat-of-the-moment accident. Unintended, unplanned. Davoli says Pasolini led a risky nocturnal secret life for years, cruising rough areas looking for these street boys, most of whom were dangerous. Pasolini, famous and wealthy in his sports car, cruising a BAD part of town. Davoli says it was only a matter of time, and that friends warned Pasolini constantly. I just found it unique that, after all the JFK-style theories and debate over the years about it, that Davoli says it's all nonsense. As for Pasolini, he was a truly GREAT artist, poet, filmmaker, intellectual. One of my top ten favorites, in fact. One thing we can all agree on is that he was gone way too soon...
    Reply
  • By David Kelly
    November 02, 2015
    07:26 PM

    I ordered this set from the BFI that includes six films by Pasolini. I already have the Criterion "Trilogy of Life" and "Salo" blu rays. I have "Mamma Roma" on DVD. But this BFI set includes the trilogy plus "Salo" but with different features, including entire bonus films , as well as "Teorema" and "Medea". Now, that I'm Region Free, this is marvelous. Still, if Criterion releases more Pasolini (including releasing "Teorema"), I'm sure I'll buy that,too!
    Reply
    • By ScorpioVelvet
      November 03, 2015
      06:54 PM

      That is pretty awesome! I am still hoping Criterion would release some of his other great films as well. SALO is my personal favorite by him, there's a lot to describe my love for that film (even though I am not shocked by the film's plot & whatnot). Again, RIP Pasolini.
  • By Steven J.
    November 03, 2015
    10:09 AM

    Great video! I didn't want it to end
    Reply
  • By HUSKY
    November 03, 2015
    05:04 PM

    Bellissimo!
    Reply
  • By obscuredbyclouds
    November 04, 2015
    04:29 PM

    Really stop and think for a second about Pasolini's entire amazing body of work as a director. In such a short life, he essentially had more impact on the cinema than even Bresson.
    Reply