Pier Paolo Pasolini

Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom

Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom

The notorious final film from Pier Paolo Pasolini, Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom has been called nauseating, shocking, depraved, pornographic . . . It’s also a masterpiece. The controversial poet, novelist, and filmmaker’s transposition of the Marquis de Sade’s eighteenth-century opus of torture and degradation to Fascist Italy in 1944 remains one of the most passionately debated films of all time, a thought-provoking inquiry into the political, social, and sexual dynamics that define the world we live in.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • "Salò": Yesterday and Today, a thirty-three-minute documentary featuring interviews with director Pier Paolo Pasolini, actor-filmmaker Jean-Claude Biette, and Pasolini friend Nineto Davoli
  • Fade to Black, a twenty-three-minute documentary featuring directors Bernardo Bertolucci, Catherine Breillat, and John Maybury, as well as scholar David Forgacs
  • The End of "Salò", a forty-minute documentary about the film’s production
  • Video interviews with set designer Dante Ferretti and director and film scholar Jean-Pierre Gorin
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack
  • Theatrical trailer
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring new essays by Neil Bartlett, Breillat, Naomi Greene, Sam Rohdie, Roberto Chiesi, and Gary Indiana, and excerpts from Gideon Bachmann’s on-set diary

New cover by Rodrigo Corral

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • "Salò": Yesterday and Today, a thirty-three-minute documentary featuring interviews with director Pier Paolo Pasolini, actor-filmmaker Jean-Claude Biette, and Pasolini friend Nineto Davoli
  • Fade to Black, a twenty-three-minute documentary featuring directors Bernardo Bertolucci, Catherine Breillat, and John Maybury, as well as scholar David Forgacs
  • The End of "Salò", a forty-minute documentary about the film’s production
  • Video interviews with set designer Dante Ferretti and director and film scholar Jean-Pierre Gorin
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack
  • Theatrical trailer
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring new essays by Neil Bartlett, Breillat, Naomi Greene, Sam Rohdie, Roberto Chiesi, and Gary Indiana, and excerpts from Gideon Bachmann’s on-set diary

New cover by Rodrigo Corral

Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom
Cast
Paolo Bonacelli
Duke
Giorgio Cataldi
Bishop
Umberto P. Quintavalle
Magistrate
Aldo Valletti
President
Caterina Boratto
Signora Castelli
Elsa De Giorgi
Signora Maggi
Hélène Surgère
Signora Vaccari
Sonia Saviange
Pianist
Credits
Director
Pier Paolo Pasolini
Writer
Pier Paolo Pasolini
With collaboration from
Sergio Citti
Producer
Alberto Grimaldi
Musical coordinator
Ennio Morricone
Director of photography
Tonino Delli Colli
Editor
Nino Baragli
Production design
Dante Ferretti
Costume design
Danilo Donati

From The Current

Salò
Salò
On November 2, 1975, the Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini was found dead—murdered, police said, by a young male prostitute. However lurid its details (the Roman tabloids ran huge front-page photos of the disfigured corpse), his death struck man…

By John Powers

Because You Can Never Have Enough  . . .
Because You Can Never Have Enough . . .
A few months back, after we announced our upcoming release of Salò, or The 120 Days of Sodom, we received a note from a viewer asking us which version of the film we would be releasing, noting that a 2001 British Film Institute (BFI) release feature…

By Kim Hendrickson

Ali Abbasi’s Top 10
Hari Nef’s Top 10
From the Pasolini Archives
From the Pasolini Archives

On the anniversary of his birth, we look back on the films of Pier Paolo Pasolini, one of the most radical figures of Italian cinema.

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Pier Paolo Pasolini

Writer, Director

Pier Paolo Pasolini
Pier Paolo Pasolini

Pier Paolo Pasolini’s ability to simultaneously embrace conflicting philosophies—he was both a Catholic and a Marxist; a modern-minded, openly gay man who looked to the distant past for inspiration and comfort; a staunch leftist who at one point in the late sixties infamously spoke out against left-wing student protests (sympathizing instead with the working-class police)—was matched by the multifariousness of his professional life, as a filmmaker, poet, journalist, novelist, playwright, painter, actor, and all-around intellectual public figure. What he is best known for, however, is undoubtedly his subversive body of film work. He was a student of the written word, and among his earliest movie jobs was writing additional dialogue for Federico Fellini’s Nights of Cabiria (1957). Soon he was directing his first film, Accattone (1961), a tale of street crime whose style and content greatly influenced the debut feature of his friend Bernardo Bertolucci, La commare secca (1962), for which Pasolini also supplied the original story. The outspoken and always political Pasolini’s films became increasingly scandalous—even, to some minds, blasphemous—from the gritty reimagining of the Christ story The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964) to the bawdy medieval tales in his Trilogy of Life (1971–1974). Tragically, Pasolini was found brutally murdered weeks before the release of his final work, the grotesque, Marquis de Sade–derived Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975), still one of the world’s most controversial films.