Author Spotlight

Graham Fuller

Graham Fuller is the editor of Loach on Loach, from which the Ken Loach quotes in this piece are taken. He has written essays for the Criterion releases of A Canterbury Tale, The Man Who Fell to Earth, Walker, The Hit, and The Last Picture Show. His website is inalonelyplace.com.

7 Results

My Beautiful Laundrette: Postcolonialism in the Wash
My Beautiful Laundrette: Postcolonialism in the Wash

Stephen Frears brings a playful and shimmering cinematic quality to Hanif Kureishi’s multilayered script about a Pakistani immigrant community in Margaret Thatcher–era London.

By Graham Fuller

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Kes: Winged Hope
Kes: Winged Hope

An Eagle for an Emperor, a Gyrfalcon for a King;   a Peregrine for a Prince, a Saker for a Knight, a Merlin for a Lady;   a Goshawk for a Yeoman, a Sparrowhawk for a Priest,   a Musket for a Holy water Clerk, a Kestrel for a Knave. …

By Graham Fuller

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The Last Picture Show: In With the Old
The Last Picture Show: In With the Old

Early in Peter Bogdanovich’s The Last Picture Show, as the wind from the Texas plains whips the small town of Anarene, the high school senior Sonny Crawford (Timothy Bottoms) halts his recalcitrant pickup truck—Hank Williams is warbling “Why…

By Graham Fuller

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The Hit: Road to Nowhere

Before the 1980s British film renaissance was curtailed by three ruinously expensive failures—Absolute Beginners, Revolution, and The Mission—it yielded a cluster of superb smaller movies, including Letter to Brezhnev, Caravaggio, and Mona Lisa. …

By Graham Fuller


Charles Laughton: Size Matters

Features

Charles Laughton: Size Matters

“Let me have men about me that are fat.” —Julius Caesar, act 1, scene 2 Just as Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe admired small, brave men who stick to their principles, I like—in the movies at least—heavyset, flamboyant types who walk a…

By Graham Fuller


The Man Who Fell to Earth:
Loving the Alien

Science-fiction drama, western, love story, metaphysical mystery, satire of modern America—The Man Who Fell to Earth is the most beguiling of the films that, in a dozen years embracing the 1970s, established Nicolas Roeg as a mainstream heir to suc…

By Graham Fuller


Walker: Apocalypse When?

At the climax of Alex Cox’s Walker (1987), a helicopter descends from the night sky onto a plaza where the colonial buildings are ablaze and an army of mercenaries is disintegrating. The chopper disgorges trigger-happy American combat troops and a …

By Graham Fuller