Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Veronika Voss

Veronika Voss

Once-beloved Third Reich–era starlet Veronika Voss (Rosel Zech) lives in obscurity in postwar Munich. Struggling for survival and haunted by past glories, the forgotten star encounters sportswriter Robert Krohn (Hilmar Thate) in a rain-swept park and intrigues him with her mysterious beauty. As their unlikely relationship develops, Krohn comes to discover the dark secrets behind the faded actresses’ demise. Based on the true story of a World War II UFA star, Veronika Voss is wicked satire disguised as 1950s melodrama.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer, enhanced for widescreen televisions
  • Audio commentary by Fassbinder scholar Tony Rayns
  • New video conversation with star Rosel Zech and editor Juliane Lorenz
  • Dance with Death (Tanz mit dem Tod), a one-hour portrait of UFA Studios star Sybille Schmitz, Fassbinder’s inspiration for the character Veronika Voss
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition

Available In

Collector's Set

The BRD Trilogy

The BRD Trilogy

DVD Box Set

4 Discs

$63.96

Out Of Print

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer, enhanced for widescreen televisions
  • Audio commentary by Fassbinder scholar Tony Rayns
  • New video conversation with star Rosel Zech and editor Juliane Lorenz
  • Dance with Death (Tanz mit dem Tod), a one-hour portrait of UFA Studios star Sybille Schmitz, Fassbinder’s inspiration for the character Veronika Voss
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition
Veronika Voss
Cast
Rosel Zech
Veronika Voss
Hilmar Thate
Robert Krohn
Cornelia Froboess
Henriette
Annemarie Düringer
Dr. Marianne Katz
Doris Schade
Josefa
Erik Schumann
Dr. Edel
Peter Berling
Film producer
Günther Kaufmann
G.I.
Sonja Neudorfer
Saleswoman
Lilo Pempeit
Chefin
Volker Spengler
Film director No. 1
Herbert Steinmetz
Gardner
Elisabeth Volkmann
Grete
Hans Wyprächtiger
Editor-in-chief
Peter Zadek
Film director No. 2
Johanna Hofer
Old married couple
Rudolf Platte
Old married couple
Armin Mueller-Stahl
Max Rehbein
Credits
Producer
Thomas Schühly
Screenplay
Peter Märthesheimer
Screenplay
Pea Fröhlich
Music
Peer Raben
Production design
Rolf Zehetbauer
Cinematography
Xaver Schwarzenberger
Film editor
Juliane Lorenz
Costume designer
Barbara Baum
Art director
Walter Richarz
Assistant directors
Karin Viesel
Assistant directors
Harry Baer
Assistant directors
Tamara Kafka
Assistant camera
Josef Vavra
Sound
Vladimir Vizner
Makeup artists
Anni Nöbauer
Makeup artists
Gerd Nemetz
Director
Rainer Werner Fassbinder

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Veronika Voss in Vancouver

The Vancity Theatre is screening Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s penultimate feature, the second installment of his BRD trilogy, a series of films centered on women in postwar Germany.

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Explore

Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Director

Rainer Werner Fassbinder made an astonishing forty-four movies—theatrical features, television movies and miniseries, and shorts among them—in a career that spanned a mere sixteen years, ending with his death at thirty-seven in 1982. He is perhaps remembered best for his intense and exquisitely shabby social melodramas (Ali: Fear Eats the Soul)—heavily influenced by Hollywood films, especially the female-driven tearjerkers of Douglas Sirk, and featuring misfit characters that often reflected his own fluid sexuality and self-destructive tendencies. But his body of work runs the gamut from epic period pieces (Berlin Alexanderplatz, the BRD Trilogy) to dystopic science fiction (World on a Wire) as well. One particular fascination of Fassbinder’s was the way the ghosts of the past, specifically those of World War II, haunted contemporary German life—an interest that wedded him to many of the other artists of the New German Cinema movement, which began in the late 1960s.