Luis Buñuel

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie

In Luis Buñuel’s deliciously satiric masterpiece, an upper-class sextet sits down to dinner but never eats, their attempts continually thwarted by a vaudevillian mixture of events both actual and imagined. Fernando Rey, Stéphane Audran, Delphine Seyrig, and Jean-Pierre Cassel head the extraordinary cast of this 1972 Oscar winner for Best Foreign Film. Criterion is proud to present The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie in an exclusive double-disc special edition.

Film Info

  • Luis Buñuel
  • France
  • 1972
  • 102 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.66:1
  • French
  • Spine #102

Special Features

  • Beautiful new widescreen high-definition transfer of the film, enhanced for 16x9 televisions
  • El náufrago de la calle de Providencia (The Castaway on the Street of Providence, 1970): a 24-minute documentary homage to Buñuel by his longtime friends Arturo Ripstein and Rafael Castanedo
  • A propósito de Buñuel (Speaking of Buñuel, 2000): a new 98-minute documentary on the life and work of Buñuel by Jose Luis López-Linares and Javier Rioyo
  • Buñuel filmography
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved optional English subtitle translation
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition
    Cover based on a theatrical poster by René Ferracci

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • Beautiful new widescreen high-definition transfer of the film, enhanced for 16x9 televisions
  • El náufrago de la calle de Providencia (The Castaway on the Street of Providence, 1970): a 24-minute documentary homage to Buñuel by his longtime friends Arturo Ripstein and Rafael Castanedo
  • A propósito de Buñuel (Speaking of Buñuel, 2000): a new 98-minute documentary on the life and work of Buñuel by Jose Luis López-Linares and Javier Rioyo
  • Buñuel filmography
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved optional English subtitle translation
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition
    Cover based on a theatrical poster by René Ferracci
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
Cast
Fernando Rey
Rafael Acosta, the ambassador
Jean-Pierre Cassel
Henri Sénéchal
Paul Frankeur
François Thévenot
Delphine Seyrig
Simone Thévenot
Stéphane Audran
Alice Sénéchal
Bulle Ogier
Florence, her sister
Michel Piccoli
The minister
Julien Bertheau
Monsignor Dufour
Milena Vukotic
Inès, the maid
Maria Gabriella Maione
The guerilla
Claude Piéplu
The colonel
Muni
The peasant woman
Pierre Maguelon
The bloody sergeant
Credits
Director
Luis Buñuel
Screenplay
Luis Buñuel
Screenplay
Jean-Claude Carrière
Producer
Serge Silberman
Cinematography
Edmond Richard
Art director
Pierre Guffroy
Editing
Hélène Plemiannikov
Sound
Guy Villette
Sound effects
Luis Buñuel
Makeup
Odette Berroyer
Makeup
Fernande Hugi
Costumes
Jacqueline Guyot

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Jean-Claude Carrière

Writer

A quietly influential force in art cinema throughout the second half of the twentieth century and beyond, screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière (also an author, actor, opera librettist, and occasional director) has collaborated with such important screen artists as Luis Buñuel, Milos Forman, Jean-Luc Godard, Philip Kaufman, Louis Malle, Nagisa Oshima, Volker Schlöndorff, and Andrzej Wajda. He got his start working with the comic filmmaker Pierre Etaix on the Oscar-winning slapstick short Happy Anniversary (1962), which the two codirected; Carrière would go on to cowrite all of Etaix’s 1960s features. Meanwhile, Buñuel enlisted Carrière to cowrite 1964’s Diary of a Chambermaid, the beginning of a grand partnership that would also result in increasingly surreal visions like Belle de jour (1967), The Milky Way (1969), The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), The Phantom of Liberty (1974), and That Obscure Object of Desire (1977). (In 2012, Carrière said of working with Buñuel, “How we mixed together is impossible to say. One started an idea, the other finished it.”) As is clear from those productions, he has a way with the absurd, but the versatile and erudite Carrière is also a keen literary adapter, translating such daunting novels as The Tin Drum and The Unbearable Lightness of Being into formidable films. Carrière’s career continues to take surprising turns: he has a small but crucial role in Abbas Kiarostami’s 2010 Certified Copy, for example.