François Truffaut

The Last Metro

The Last Metro

Gérard Depardieu and Catherine Deneuve star as members of a French theater company living under the German occupation during World War II in François Truffaut’s gripping, humanist character study. Against all odds—a Jewish theater manager in hiding; a leading man who’s in the Resistance; increasingly restrictive Nazi oversight—the troupe believes the show must go on. Equal parts romance, historical tragedy, and even comedy, The Last Metro (Le dernier métro) is Truffaut’s ultimate tribute to art overcoming adversity.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Two audio commentaries: one featuring Annette Insdorf, author of François Truffaut, and one with actor Gérard Depardieu, historian Jean-Pierre Azéma, and Truffaut biographer Serge Toubiana
  • Deleted scene
  • French television excerpts of interviews with Truffaut, and actors Catherine Deneuve, Depardieu, and Jean Poiret
  • New video interviews with actresses Andréa Ferréol, Sabine Haudepin, and Paulette Dubost, assistant director Alain Tasma, and camera assistants Florent Bazin and Tessa Racine
  • A video interview with the celebrated cinematographer Nestor Almendros, detailing his collaborations with Truffaut
  • Une histoire d’eau, Truffaut’s 1958 short film co-directed by Jean-Luc Godard
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by Armond White

New cover by Rodrigo Corral

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Two audio commentaries: one featuring Annette Insdorf, author of François Truffaut, and one with actor Gérard Depardieu, historian Jean-Pierre Azéma, and Truffaut biographer Serge Toubiana
  • Deleted scene
  • French television excerpts of interviews with Truffaut, and actors Catherine Deneuve, Depardieu, and Jean Poiret
  • New video interviews with actresses Andréa Ferréol, Sabine Haudepin, and Paulette Dubost, assistant director Alain Tasma, and camera assistants Florent Bazin and Tessa Racine
  • A video interview with the celebrated cinematographer Nestor Almendros, detailing his collaborations with Truffaut
  • Une histoire d’eau, Truffaut’s 1958 short film co-directed by Jean-Luc Godard
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by Armond White

New cover by Rodrigo Corral

The Last Metro
Cast
Catherine Deneuve
Marion Steiner
Gérard Depardieu
Bernard Granger
Jean Poiret
Jean-Loup Cottins
Andréa Ferréol
Arlette Guillaume
Paulette Dubost
Germaine Fabre
Jean-Louis Richard
Daxiat
Sabine Haudepin
Nadine Marsac
Maurice Risch
Raymond
Heinz Bennent
Lucas Steiner
Christian Baltauss
Bernard’s replacement
René Dupré
Valentin
Credits
Director
François Truffaut
Screenplay
François Truffaut
Screenplay
Suzanne Schiffman
Dialogue
François Truffaut
Dialogue
Suzanne Schiffman
Dialogue
Jean-Claude Grumberg
Cinematography
Nestor Almendros
Music
Georges Delerue
Editing
Martine Barraqué
Production design
Jean-Pierre Kohut-Svelko
Sound
Michel Laurent
Sound
Michel Mellier
Costume design
Lisele Roos

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Flashbacks

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The author recalls his encounters and correspondence with the filmmaker.

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The Last Metro

Writing the screenplay for The Last Metro with Suzanne Schiffman, I intended to do for the theater what I had done for the cinema in Day for Night: the chronicle of a troupe at work, within a framework respecting the unities of place, time, and actio…

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Truffaut’s Changing Times:
The Last Metro

The Last Metro was the most crowd-pleasing film of François Truffaut’s latter career, sweeping an armload of prizes at France’s Oscar equivalent, the César Awards. It was also as personal a film as he had ever made, and that denotes the film’…

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Explore

Georges Delerue

Composer

Composer Georges Delerue, once named “the Mozart of cinema” by the French newspaper Le Figaro, wrote more than 350 film and television scores, along with pop songs, ballads, and orchestral pieces. In the course of his work with such titans of cinema as Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, Alain Resnais, Mike Nichols, and Oliver Stone, Delerue, a native of Roubaix, France, created some of the most evocative film music of all time. Although he was trained in metallurgy, and began his working life in a metal factory, his lineage was musical (grandfather a choral singer, mother a pianist), and he found himself drawn in that direction, first studying the clarinet and eventually beginning to compose. After doing some scoring for television and short films (including Agnès Varda’s early short L’opéra mouffe, which is available on Criterion’s edition of Cléo from 5 to 7), Delerue was approached by Resnais and Truffaut to write the themes to Hiroshima mon amour and Shoot the Piano Player, two works at the forefront of the French New Wave movement. The scores for which he is now best known followed close on their heels: his energetic, lovely melody for Jules and Jim and his grand, swoony, undulating theme for Contempt—the latter appropriated years later by Martin Scorsese for his 1995 drama Casino. Delerue’s stature grew, thanks to scores for such films as The Two of Us and King of Hearts, and eventually he would not only win an Oscar (for 1979’s A Little Romance) and three Césars in a row (for Get Out Your Handkerchiefs, Love on the Run, and The Last Metro) but also be named a Commander of Arts and Letters, one of France’s highest cultural honors. He came to Hollywood in the eighties and wrote music for Platoon, Beaches, and Steel Magnolias, among others. Delerue died in 1992.