The Daily

Gotham Nod for Cameraperson, Yang Restored, Scorsese on Brando

On Film / Short Takes — Nov 11, 2016
  • Legendary French cinematographer Raoul Coutard, who created some of the most indelible images in film history, has passed away at the age of ninety-two. The BFI pays tribute to him by republishing an article from the winter 1965–1966 issue of Sight & Sound, in which Coutard recalls collaborating with Jean-Luc Godard.
  • The Guardian has also published a tribute to the late cinematographer with a look back on his life in pictures.
  • In anticipation of an upcoming John Cassavetes retrospective at the New Beverly Cinema, in Los Angeles, writer Kim Morgan interviews the great Gena Rowlands.
  • At the Village Voice, Melissa Anderson examines the work of subversive Dutch filmmaker Paul Verhoeven, who is the subject of a retrospective now playing at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. On the director’s ever-controversial Showgirls, Anderson writes: “What once struck me as wan camp I now appreciate as vulgar brio, the film’s sordid Las Vegas milieu of strip clubs and All About Eve–like deceit and machinations a down-and-dirty dissection of this country’s supply-and-demand soul-sickness.”
  • Also at the Voice, Lucian K. Truscott IV reflects on his days in New York in the 1970s, when he lived in the same apartment as Bob Dylan.
  • For RogerEbert.com, Simon Abrams interviews Japanese screen legend Tatsuya Nakadai, who recently appeared at the Museum of the Moving Image’s fiftieth-anniversary screening of The Sword of Doom.
  • Little White Lies has the scoop on the revival of Abel Gance’s boundary-breaking historical epic Napoleon, which the BFI is bringing to the big screen and home video.
  • On Film Comment’s latest podcast, blacklisted screenwriter Walter Bernstein and Cuban novelist Edmundo Desnoes explore how art grapples with political reality.
  • At the Metrograph Edition, Nick Pinkerton reflects on the social history captured in Ezra Edelman’s monumental documentary OJ: Made in America.