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    Coming off the success of John, her latest acclaimed stage production, Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright Annie Baker is more in demand than ever. And although she's often reserved when speaking about her work, lately Baker has been offering deeper insight into her process and goals as an artist. In a recent interview published in BOMB, she broaches a subject many of her fans have long wondered about: a possible foray into filmmaking. Baker’s an avowed cinephile herself, and her celebrated play The Flick, which is set entirely in the confines of a small cinema, was inspired by an experience she had at a screening of Fanny and Alexander. She has been a writer for hire in the past, but Baker says that now she’s only interested in writing movies that she can direct herself (and she mentions that she has a film project currently in the works).

    She's also reluctant to let anyone else bring her own plays to the screen. “When people have asked to make movie adaptations of my plays, I draw the line,” she says. “Once I was like, Well, if you wanted to do one long shot, with no close-ups, then you can do it. And they were like, You can’t have a movie that’s one long shot. But, now that we’re talking about it, I actually am really interested in making a film that’s one long shot for two hours, with no close-ups or change in location.”

    Read the interview in full at BOMB’s website. Also, earlier this week, Baker spoke with Marc Maron for his podcast, WTF, which you can listen to in full.

    For more on Annie Baker’s cinematic tastes, check out her Criterion Top 10, featuring the filmmakers who’ve changed her life, from Chantal Akerman to Andrei Tarkovsky.

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