30 comments

  • By Benjamin Ricci
    June 20, 2012
    03:27 PM

    Awesome job, really cool to see the before and after comparisons.
    Reply
  • By Bobby
    June 20, 2012
    03:33 PM

    Kudos, a really Wonderful job!
    Reply
  • By John Bailey
    June 20, 2012
    03:41 PM

    Even for a dedicated "film" person like me, I am constantly amazed at the ever improving digital technology being used in restoring classic films. The recent Jean Vigo "L'Atalante" is miraculous. Chaplin's classic films are way overdue for the sensitive and dedicated work that is the hallmark of Criterion.
    Reply
  • By Hunter Hale
    June 20, 2012
    03:47 PM

    To be able to see one of the truly classic silent films in such a beautiful presentation (with Chaplin's music) hast to rank as one of your most important offerings. I have owned prints of THE GOLD RUSH on Super 8mm, 16mm, Laser Disc, Video and more then one version on DVD, but the Criterion release on Blu-ray is a brand new experience. Thanks to Kevin Brownlow and all at Criterion is were willing to put the time and money into this project.
    Reply
  • By ALH
    June 20, 2012
    04:17 PM

    Reformatting the footage from the prints with optical soundtrack just removes more information, further compromising the frame and Chaplin's original intent. I don't agree with that decision AT ALL.
    Reply
    • By AnalogJeff
      June 20, 2012
      04:46 PM

      I had that same reaction -- that we're losing some of the information, some of the composition for the sake of "proper" aspect ratio.
    • By theiny
      June 21, 2012
      06:28 AM

      I strongly agree - I would have expected a more sensible approach by Criterion... As seen in the recent restauration of Metropolis, it IS possible to combine different aspect ratios without confusing the viewer too much. The decision here is clearly and sadly a huge nod to the mainstream market, and a wasted opportunity to 'teach' the regular viewer a more historical accurate watching of the film.
    • By Jim
      June 23, 2012
      04:59 PM

      Actually, this is the accurate way to present the film. The optical sound track and the film edges are always matted out by the projector to a particular aspect ratio. In this era, it was usually 1.37:1. Even current films have soundtrack information outside the frame and between the sprocket holes, but you don't see it. #rtfm
  • By Come on guys!
    June 20, 2012
    04:24 PM

    Awesome job, and here's a vote for similar Criterion magic with the Marx Brothers, talk about a subject long over due!
    Reply
    • By RV Gomez
      August 19, 2012
      06:50 PM

      Yes and Amen!
  • By Znanna Liberzon
    June 20, 2012
    04:45 PM

    Maybe better to leave Chaplin alone for the sake of truth.
    Reply
  • By Marty
    June 20, 2012
    05:03 PM

    Very excited to see the blu ray version of Gold Rush. Love that short video showing the restoration. Congratulations and thanks for all that hard work. Now get to work on "City Lights"! Oh yeah...those old Marx Brother's films could use a clean-up as well.
    Reply
  • By Rickey Freeman
    June 20, 2012
    05:03 PM

    Couldn't agree more this treatment is long overdue for The Marx Brothers!
    Reply
  • By Michael Golding
    June 20, 2012
    05:50 PM

    This clip is remarkable. I'm Looking forward to owning a copy. Already have Modern Times and the Great Dictator. When is The Kid coming to Criterion?
    Reply
    • By Ryan Boyd
      June 22, 2012
      12:17 AM

      I second this motion.
  • By Monty Britton
    June 20, 2012
    06:25 PM

    Criterion has ALWAYS done phenominal work on film restorations since I discovered them in my Laserdisc years. Boy, how technologies have changed! Never thought I would see Criterion doing hi def. They do such good work that I must purchase the blu rays when available. They are worth the upgrade! I look forward to every title Criterion puts out because I KNOW that they know what they are doing (unlike most of these money hungry studios) when it comes to their releases. It is a shame they lost the rights for The Grand Illusion on blu ray. They did such a great job on the DVD from years ago. Studios need to let Criterion put out more of their releases because they do it right! Thanks Criterion, you are the best!!
    Reply
  • By Bill Dakota
    June 20, 2012
    06:48 PM

    Now try to restore the black & white scenes in the THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT movies. A collection of Hollywood's MGM features and only half restored. A shame.
    Reply
  • By Leonardo Mustachio
    June 20, 2012
    07:59 PM

    Great work, Criterion. Incredible film restorations. By the way, don't you think that both The Go-Between and Isadora belong on the Criterion list? Neither film is on Dvd.
    Reply
  • By Chad G.
    June 21, 2012
    12:30 AM

    This little video should be included on all subsequent Criterion releases to showcase exactly what they do. Bravo.
    Reply
  • By Carl
    June 21, 2012
    02:06 PM

    I say let ALH, AnalogJeff and theiny watch the old, faded, scratched and dirty versions in the proper aspect ratios. I'm always amazed that when folks like Criterion do noble work for the preservation of film there's always a few nitpickers who want to crap on it.
    Reply
    • By Shaun
      June 22, 2012
      06:38 PM

      Criterion silence free thought...including mine...people have a right to go against the status quo and offer differing opinions. Criterion: shame for censoring my respectful comments; you have a history of altering product for markets and not art...usually you're great. This my be for the censor's eye only...here goes n'thing
    • By Anna T.
      June 25, 2012
      03:07 PM

      Shaun, your earlier comment has been freed from the automated spam filter. It was not intentionally held from being posted; we never saw it. Sorry about that.
  • By Shaun
    June 21, 2012
    03:32 PM

    I disagree Carl. Although I too love Criterion, telling these intelligent users (making good points) to be quiet and do what they're told is anathema to many cineastes; we're a freethinking and intelligent bunch. Although it's great to have The Gold Rush (and all the other great Criterion titles) it's simply silly to ignore the fact that Criterion does alter their titles for business reasons that are not entirely faithful to the film itself. Take their "window boxing" practice as another example. I do not know enough about this issue to say who's correct, but I do not trust ANY sentiment that essentially says "don't question the status quo". A little respectful difference of opinion is healthy especially when it's about film scholarship and preservation.
    Reply
  • By C Chan
    June 22, 2012
    05:22 PM

    Thanks for all the people who worked so hard to restore such a classic movie. Can't wait to see the full version of "Gold Rush"
    Reply
  • By Soledad Robledo
    June 25, 2012
    09:35 PM

    How wonderful! It's magical... Movie lovers couldn't be happier with Criterion,
    Reply
  • By Shaun
    June 26, 2012
    12:46 AM

    Anna, thank you for bothering to say anything. I apologize too - I should have followed my mother's advice and counted to 10 first. Just bought this release today - wonderful film. I think both look fine. The '25 version is my favorite - Chaplin's voiceover is a bit much for me. It seems as if Criterion agrees? The commentary accompanies the "supplemental" 1925 film, not the "Chaplin approved" 1942 version. :)
    Reply
    • By zefwagner
      November 19, 2012
      02:10 AM

      Much like the way the original versions of the Star Wars movies are superior to the "director approved" Special Editions, the 1925 Gold Rush is superior to Chaplin's wrong-headed attempt to update it for modern audiences. It's nice to have both, but the 1925 version should be considered the definitive edition.
  • By Adolph
    January 11, 2014
    10:46 AM

    where can I get the Chalie Chaplaine movies?
    Reply