• Japan
  • 1956
  • 85 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.33:1
  • Japanese
  •  

For his final film, Mizoguchi brought a lifetime of experience to bear on the heartbreaking tale of a brothel full of women whose dreams are constantly being shattered by the socioeconomic realities surrounding them. Set in Tokyo’s Red Light District (the literal translation of the Japanese title), Street of Shame was so cutting, and its popularity so great, that when an antiprostitution law was passed in Japan just a few months after the film’s release, some said it was a catalyst.

Credits

DirectorKenji Mizoguchi
ProducerMasaichi Nagata
ScreenplayMasashige Narusawa
Based partly on the novel “Women of Susaki” byYoshiko Shibaki
CinematographyKazuo Miagawa
EditingKanji Sugawara
MusicTashiro Mayuzumi
Art directionHiroshi Mizutani

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Eclipse Series 13: Kenji Mizoguchi’s Fallen Women

By Michael Koresky October 20, 2008

Though he had been directing films since the silent era, collaborating with many different film studios in various genres, Kenji Mizoguchi didn’t become an international sensation until after . . . Read more »

Clippings

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Photo Galleries

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Press Notes

Press Notes: Mizoguchi Ascendant

October 26, 2008

The ongoing rediscovery of the multitude of masterworks that made up the career of Kenji Mizoguchi continues with the release of Eclipse Series 13: Kenji Mizoguchi’s Fallen Women. The set, . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Eclipse Series 13: Kenji Mizoguchi’s Fallen Women

By Michael Koresky October 20, 2008

Though he had been directing films since the silent era, collaborating with many different film studios in various genres, Kenji Mizoguchi didn’t become an international sensation until after . . . Read more »

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