Georges Franju

Eyes Without a Face

Eyes Without a Face

At his secluded chateau in the French countryside, a brilliant, obsessive doctor (Pierre Brasseur) attempts a radical plastic surgery to restore the beauty of his daughter’s disfigured countenance—at a horrifying price. Eyes Without a Face, directed by the supremely talented Georges Franju, is rare in horror cinema for its odd mixture of the ghastly and the lyrical, and it has been a major influence on the genre in the decades since its release. There are images here—of terror, of gore, of inexplicable beauty—that once seen are never forgotten.

Film Info

  • Georges Franju
  • France
  • 1960
  • 90 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.66:1
  • French
  • Spine #260

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Blood of the Beasts, Georges Franju’s 1949 documentary about the slaughterhouses of Paris (high-definition digital restoration on the Blu-ray edition)
  • Archival interviews with Franju on the horror genre, cinema, and the making of Blood of the Beasts
  • New interview with actor Edith Scob (Blu-ray only)
  • Excerpts from Les grands-pères du crime, a 1985 documentary about Eyes Without a Face writers Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac
  • Trailers
  • Stills gallery of rare production photos and promotional material (DVD only)
  • Plus: A booklet featuring essays by novelist Patrick McGrath and film historian David Kalat

New cover by Aesthetic Apparatus

Purchase Options

On backorder, available Nov 10, 2018

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Blood of the Beasts, Georges Franju’s 1949 documentary about the slaughterhouses of Paris (high-definition digital restoration on the Blu-ray edition)
  • Archival interviews with Franju on the horror genre, cinema, and the making of Blood of the Beasts
  • New interview with actor Edith Scob (Blu-ray only)
  • Excerpts from Les grands-pères du crime, a 1985 documentary about Eyes Without a Face writers Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac
  • Trailers
  • Stills gallery of rare production photos and promotional material (DVD only)
  • Plus: A booklet featuring essays by novelist Patrick McGrath and film historian David Kalat

New cover by Aesthetic Apparatus

Eyes Without a Face
Cast
Pierre Brasseur
Dr. Génessier
Alida Valli
Louise
François Guérin
Jacques Vernon
Edith Scob
Christiane Génessier
Juliette Mayniel
Edna Grüberg
Alexandre Rignault
Detective Parot
Béatrice Altariba
Paulette Mérodon
Charles Blavette
Dog pound employee
Claude Brasseur
Second police detective
Credits
Director
Georges Franju
Producer
Jules Borkon
Based on the novel by
Jean Redon
Screenplay adaptation by
Pierre Boileau
Screenplay adaptation by
Thomas Narcejac
Screenplay adaptation by
Jean Redon
Screenplay adaptation by
Claude Sautet
Dialogue
Pierre Gascar
Music
Maurice Jarre
Production manager
Pierre Laurent
Director of photography
Eugen Schüfftan
Sets
Auguste Capelier
Assistant director
Claude Sautet
Cameraman
Robert Schneider
Makeup
Georges Klein
Special effects
Henri Assola
Editor
Gilbert Natot
Sound engineer
Antoine Archimbaud

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