Jean Renoir

The Golden Coach

The Golden Coach

The Golden Coach (Le Carrosse d’or) is a ravishing eighteenth-century comic fantasy about a viceroy who receives an exquisite golden coach, and gives it to the tempestuous star of a touring commedia dell’arte company. Master director Jean Renoir’s sumptuous tribute to the theater, presented here in the English version he favored, is set to the music of Antonio Vivaldi and built around vivacious and volatile star Anna Magnani.

Film Info

  • Jean Renoir
  • France
  • 1953
  • 103 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  • Spine #242

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer, with restored image and sound
  • Introduction to the film by Jean Renoir
  • Video introduction by director Martin Scorsese
  • Jean Renoir parle de son art: part one of Jacques Rivette's three-part interview with Renoir
  • A collection of rare production stills
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hearing impaired
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition
  • Plus: a new essay by writer Jonathan Rosenbaum on The Golden Coach, French Cancan, and Elena and Her Men, and an original essay by film critic Andrew Sarris

Available In

Collector's Set

Stage and Spectacle: Three Films by Jean Renoir

Stage and Spectacle: Three Films by Jean Renoir

DVD Box Set

3 Discs

$63.96

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer, with restored image and sound
  • Introduction to the film by Jean Renoir
  • Video introduction by director Martin Scorsese
  • Jean Renoir parle de son art: part one of Jacques Rivette's three-part interview with Renoir
  • A collection of rare production stills
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hearing impaired
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition
  • Plus: a new essay by writer Jonathan Rosenbaum on The Golden Coach, French Cancan, and Elena and Her Men, and an original essay by film critic Andrew Sarris
The Golden Coach
Cast
Anna Magnani
Camilla
Odoardo Spadaro
Don Antonio
Nada Fiorelli
Isabella
Duncan Lamont
The viceroy
George Higgins
Martinez
Ralph Truman
The duke
Gisella Matthews
The marquise
Raf de la Torre
The chief justice
Elena Altieri
The duchesse
Paul Campbell
Felipe
Riccardo Rioli
Ramon, the bullfighter
William C. Tubbs
The innkeeper
Jean Debucourt
The bishop
Credits
Director
Jean Renoir
Producers
Francesco Alliata
Producers
Renzo Avanzo
Writers
Renzo Avanzo
Writers
Ginette Doynel
Writers
Jack Kirkland
Writers
Giulio Macchi
Writers
Jean Renoir
From the play by
Prosper Mérimée
Cinematography
Claude Renoir
Editing
David Hawkins
Set designer
Mario Chiari
Set decoration
Gino Brosio
Costume designer
Maria De Matteis
Sound recordist
Joseph de Bretagne
Music
Antonio Vivaldi

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Explore

Jean Renoir

Writer, Director

The son of the great impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Jean Renoir was also a master of his medium: cinema. After making his mark in the early thirties with two very different films, the anarchic send-up of the bourgeoisie Boudu Saved from Drowning and the popular-front Gorky adaptation The Lower Depths, Renoir closed out the decade with two critical humanistic studies of French society that routinely turn up on lists of the greatest films ever made: Grand Illusion and The Rules of the Game (the former was celebrated in its time, but the latter was trashed by critics and audiences—until history provided vindication). After a brief, unfulfilling Hollywood stint during World War II, Renoir traveled to India to make his first Technicolor film, The River, and then returned to Europe in the early fifties to direct three visually dazzling explorations of theater, The Golden Coach, French Cancan, and Elena and Her Men. Renoir persisted in his cinematic pursuits until the late sixties, when, after the completion of The Little Theater of Jean Renoir, a collection of three short films, he decided to dedicate himself solely to writing, leaving the future of the medium to those who looked to him in reverence.