Toni

In 1934, Jean Renoir stepped off the soundstage and headed to the South of France, where he captured vivid human drama amid the bucolic splendor and everyday social rituals of the countryside. Based on a true story and set in a community of immigrants living, working, and loving on the margins of French society, Toni follows the eponymous Italian migrant (Charles Blavette), whose tempestuous affairs with two women—the faithful Marie (Jenny Hélia) and the flirtatious Josefa (Celia Montalván)—unleash a wave of tragedy. Making use of nonprofessional actors, on-location shooting, and the resources of the great Marcel Pagnol’s Provence studio, Renoir crafts a marvel of poetic feeling that became a precursor to Italian neorealism and a favorite of the directors of the French New Wave.

Film Info

  • Jean Renoir
  • France
  • 1935
  • 84 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.37:1
  • French
  • Spine #1040

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Audio commentary from 2006 featuring critics Kent Jones and Phillip Lopate
  • Introduction by director Jean Renoir from 1961
  • Episode of Cinéastes de notre temps from 1967 on Renoir, directed by Jacques Rivette and featuring a conversation with actor Charles Blavette about the film
  • New video essay about the making of Toni by film scholar Christopher Faulkner
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by film scholar Ginette Vincendeau

New cover by Katherine Lam

Purchase Options

Coming soon, available Aug 25, 2020

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Audio commentary from 2006 featuring critics Kent Jones and Phillip Lopate
  • Introduction by director Jean Renoir from 1961
  • Episode of Cinéastes de notre temps from 1967 on Renoir, directed by Jacques Rivette and featuring a conversation with actor Charles Blavette about the film
  • New video essay about the making of Toni by film scholar Christopher Faulkner
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by film scholar Ginette Vincendeau

New cover by Katherine Lam

Toni
Credits
Director
Jean Renoir
Screenplay by
Jean Renoir
Screenplay by
Carl Einstein
Dialogue by
Jacques Levert
Producer
Pierre Gaut
Associate producer
Marcel Pagnol
Cinematography
Claude Renoir
Editing
Suzanne de Troeye
Editing
Marguerite Renoir

Explore

Jean Renoir

Writer, Director

Jean Renoir
Jean Renoir

The son of the great impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Jean Renoir was also a master of his medium: cinema. After making his mark in the early thirties with two very different films, the anarchic send-up of the bourgeoisie Boudu Saved from Drowning and the popular-front Gorky adaptation The Lower Depths, Renoir closed out the decade with two critical humanistic studies of French society that routinely turn up on lists of the greatest films ever made: Grand Illusion and The Rules of the Game (the former was celebrated in its time, but the latter was trashed by critics and audiences—until history provided vindication). After a brief, unfulfilling Hollywood stint during World War II, Renoir traveled to India to make his first Technicolor film, The River, and then returned to Europe in the early fifties to direct three visually dazzling explorations of theater, The Golden Coach, French Cancan, and Elena and Her Men. Renoir persisted in his cinematic pursuits until the late sixties, when, after the completion of The Little Theater of Jean Renoir, a collection of three short films, he decided to dedicate himself solely to writing, leaving the future of the medium to those who looked to him in reverence.