Ran Film Still

Ran

Akira Kurosawa

 
Ran (Criterion DVD)

DVD

2 Discs

SRP: $39.95

Out of Print
  • Japan
  • 1985
  • 160 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.85:1
  • Japanese
  •  
  • Spine #316

With Ran, legendary director Akira Kurosawa reimagines Shakespeare’s King Lear as a singular historical epic set in sixteenth-century Japan. Majestic in scope, the film is Kurosawa’s late-life masterpiece, a profound examination of the folly of war and the crumbling of one family under the weight of betrayal, greed, and the insatiable thirst for power.

Disc Features

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • Audio commentary featuring film scholar Stephen Prince
  • An appreciation of the film by director Sidney Lumet
  • A.K., a 74-minute film by director Chris Marker
  • A 30-minute documentary on the making of Ran, from the Toho Masterworks series Akira Kurosawa: It Is Wonderful to Create
  • A 35-minute video piece reconstructing Ran through Kurosawa’s paintings and sketches, created as part of the series Image: Kurosawa’s Continuity
  • Video interview with actor Tatsuya Nakadai
  • Theatrical trailers
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus: A booklet featuring an essay by critic Michael Wilmington and interviews with Kurosawa and composer Toru Takemitsu

    New cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang

Film Essays

Ran: Apocalypse Song

By Michael Wilmington November 21, 2005

Ran is the late masterpiece and testament of a great director contemplating his own twilight—and the world’s as well. It’s a tragedy fed by Shakespeare, Noh, and the samurai epic, full of . . . Read more »

Hulu

Screen_shot_2016-06-23_at_1.14.59_pm_thumbnail

Repertory Pick: Kurosawa in Toronto

June 23, 2016

This week, the TIFF Cinematheque in Toronto will show Akira Kurosawa’s 1960 dramatic thriller The Bad Sleep Well as part of its summer series of special screenings. Starring the Japanese screen . . . Read more »


Photo Galleries


Film Essays

Ran: Apocalypse Song

By Michael Wilmington November 21, 2005

Ran is the late masterpiece and testament of a great director contemplating his own twilight—and the world’s as well. It’s a tragedy fed by Shakespeare, Noh, and the samurai epic, full of . . . Read more »

Close

Log in to your Criterion.com account