François Truffaut

Love on the Run

Love on the Run

Antoine Doinel strikes again! In the final chapter of François Truffaut’s saga, we find Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud), now in his thirties, convivially concluding his marriage, enjoying moderate success as a novelist, and clinging to his romantic fantasies. The newly single Doinel finds a new object of his affections in Sabine, a record store salesgirl whom he pursues with the fervid belief that without love, one is nothing. Along the way, he renews his acquaintance with previous loves and confronts his own chaotic past. In Love on the Run, Antoine Doinel is still in love and because he’s still in love, he’s still alive.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New digital transfer, enhanced for widescreen televisions
  • Rare television interview excerpt of Truffaut and actress/co-writer Marie-France Pisier discussing their working styles and their feelings about Love on the Run
  • Excerpt from the 1980 TV show Cinescope in which Truffaut addresses his misgivings about his finale to the Doinel series, and illuminates his feelings about Jean-Pierre Léaud and Antoine Doinel
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation

Available In

Collector's Set

The Adventures of Antoine Doinel

The Adventures of Antoine Doinel

DVD Box Set

5 Discs

$79.96

Out Of Print

Special Features

  • New digital transfer, enhanced for widescreen televisions
  • Rare television interview excerpt of Truffaut and actress/co-writer Marie-France Pisier discussing their working styles and their feelings about Love on the Run
  • Excerpt from the 1980 TV show Cinescope in which Truffaut addresses his misgivings about his finale to the Doinel series, and illuminates his feelings about Jean-Pierre Léaud and Antoine Doinel
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
Love on the Run
Cast
Jean-Pierre Léaud
Antoine Doinel
Marie-France Pisier
Colette
Claude Jade
Christine Doinel
Dani
Liliane
Julien Bertheau
Monsieur Lucien
Rosy Varte
Colette's mother
Daniel Mesguich
Xavier
Dorothée
Sabine
Credits
Director
François Truffaut
Screenplay
François Truffaut
Screenplay
Jean Aurel
Screenplay
Suzanne Schiffman
Screenplay
Marie-France Pisier
Cinematography
Nestor Almendros
Cinematography
Florent Bazin
Cinematography
Emilia Pakull-Latorre
Art direction
Jean-Pierre Kohut-Svelko
Art direction
Pierre Gompertz
Art direction
Jean-Louis Povéda
Music
Georges Delerue
Editing
Martine Barraqué
Editing
Jean Gargonne
Editing
Corinne Lapassade

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The smart folks at the niftily designed film website Not Coming to a Theater Near You are in the midst of a monthlong feature titled Love on the Run: The Films of François Truffaut. One essay and film at a time, the writers will be delving into the …

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Love on the Run

While making Love on the Run, François Truffaut knew that it would be the end of the Antoine Doinel cycle. He also wanted the film to be the cycle’s recapitulation. Love on the Run prolongs Antoine’s adventures (or his “flight,” to recall th…

By Chris Fujiwara


Explore

Georges Delerue

Composer

Composer Georges Delerue, once named “the Mozart of cinema” by the French newspaper Le Figaro, wrote more than 350 film and television scores, along with pop songs, ballads, and orchestral pieces. In the course of his work with such titans of cinema as Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, Alain Resnais, Mike Nichols, and Oliver Stone, Delerue, a native of Roubaix, France, created some of the most evocative film music of all time. Although he was trained in metallurgy, and began his working life in a metal factory, his lineage was musical (grandfather a choral singer, mother a pianist), and he found himself drawn in that direction, first studying the clarinet and eventually beginning to compose. After doing some scoring for television and short films (including Agnès Varda’s early short L’opéra mouffe, which is available on Criterion’s edition of Cléo from 5 to 7), Delerue was approached by Resnais and Truffaut to write the themes to Hiroshima mon amour and Shoot the Piano Player, two works at the forefront of the French New Wave movement. The scores for which he is now best known followed close on their heels: his energetic, lovely melody for Jules and Jim and his grand, swoony, undulating theme for Contempt—the latter appropriated years later by Martin Scorsese for his 1995 drama Casino. Delerue’s stature grew, thanks to scores for such films as The Two of Us and King of Hearts, and eventually he would not only win an Oscar (for 1979’s A Little Romance) and three Césars in a row (for Get Out Your Handkerchiefs, Love on the Run, and The Last Metro) but also be named a Commander of Arts and Letters, one of France’s highest cultural honors. He came to Hollywood in the eighties and wrote music for Platoon, Beaches, and Steel Magnolias, among others. Delerue died in 1992.