Alfred Hitchcock

Spellbound

Spellbound

Dr. Constance Petersen (Ingrid Bergman) is a psychiatrist with a firm understanding of human nature—or so she thinks. When the mysterious Dr. Anthony Edwardes (Gregory Peck) becomes the new chief of staff at her institution, the bookish and detached Constance plummets into a whirlwind of tangled identities and feverish psychoanalysis, where the greatest risk is to fall in love. A transcendent love story replete with taut excitement and startling imagery, Spellbound is classic Hitchcock, featuring stunning performances, an Academy Award®-winning score by Miklos Rozsa, and a captivating dream sequence by Surrealist icon Salvador Dalí.

Film Info

  • Alfred Hitchcock
  • United States
  • 1945
  • 111 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  • Spine #136

Special Features

  • Spectacular new digital transfer with film and sound restoration, including rare theater entrance and exit music cues by composer Miklos Rozsa
  • Commentary by Hitchcock scholar Marian Keane
  • "A Nightmare Ordered by Telephone," an in-depth, illustrated essay on the Salvador Dalí-designed dream sequence by James Bigwood
  • Excerpts from a 1973 audio interview with composer Miklos Rozsa
  • Complete 1948 Lux Radio Theatre adaptation starring Joseph Cotten and Alida Valli
  • The Fishko Files: a WNYC/New York Public Radio piece on the theremin
  • Essays by noted Hitchcock scholars Lesley Brill (The Hitchcock Romance) and Leonard Leff (Hitchcock and Selznick)
  • Hundreds of behind-the-scenes photos and documents chronicling the film’s production, from set photos to ads, posters, and publicity material
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hearing-impaired
    New cover by William Logan and Amy Hoisington

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • Spectacular new digital transfer with film and sound restoration, including rare theater entrance and exit music cues by composer Miklos Rozsa
  • Commentary by Hitchcock scholar Marian Keane
  • "A Nightmare Ordered by Telephone," an in-depth, illustrated essay on the Salvador Dalí-designed dream sequence by James Bigwood
  • Excerpts from a 1973 audio interview with composer Miklos Rozsa
  • Complete 1948 Lux Radio Theatre adaptation starring Joseph Cotten and Alida Valli
  • The Fishko Files: a WNYC/New York Public Radio piece on the theremin
  • Essays by noted Hitchcock scholars Lesley Brill (The Hitchcock Romance) and Leonard Leff (Hitchcock and Selznick)
  • Hundreds of behind-the-scenes photos and documents chronicling the film’s production, from set photos to ads, posters, and publicity material
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Optimal image quality: RSDL dual-layer edition
  • English subtitles for the deaf and hearing-impaired
    New cover by William Logan and Amy Hoisington

Spellbound
Cast
Ingrid Bergman
Dr. Constance Petersen
Gregory Peck
J.B.
Michael Chekhov
Dr. Alex Brulov
Leo G. Carroll
Dr. Murchison
Rhonda Fleming
Mary Carmichael
John Emery
Dr. Fleurot
Norman Lloyd
Mr. Garmes
Bill Goodwin
Detective
Credits
Director
Alfred Hitchcock
Producer
David O. Selznick
Screenplay
Ben Hecht
Suggested by the novel The House of Dr. Edwardes by
Francis Beeding
Adaptation by
Angus MacPhail
Dream sequence based on designs by
Salvador Dalí
Psychiatric advisor
May E. Romm
Cinematography
George Barnes
Music
Miklós Rózsa
Art director
James Basevi
Associate art director
John Ewing
Editing
Hal C. Kern
Associate film editor
William H. Ziegler
Production assistant
Barbara Keon
Special effects
Jack Cosgrove
Interior decoration by
Emile Kurl
Assistant director
Lowell J. Farrell
Recordist
Richard Deweese

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