Rebecca

Romance becomes psychodrama in the elegantly crafted Rebecca, Alfred Hitchcock’s first foray into Hollywood filmmaking. A dreamlike adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 novel, the film stars the enchanting Joan Fontaine as a young woman who believes she has found her heart’s desire when she marries the dashing aristocratic widower Maxim de Winter (played with cunning vulnerability by Laurence Olivier). But upon moving to Manderley—her groom’s baroque ancestral mansion—she soon learns that his deceased wife haunts not only the estate but the temperamental, brooding Maxim as well. The start of Hitchcock’s legendary collaboration with producer David O. Selznick, this elegiac gothic vision, captured in stunning black and white by George Barnes, took home the Academy Awards for best picture and best cinematography.

Film Info

  • Alfred Hitchcock
  • United States
  • 1940
  • 130 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.33:1
  • English
  • Spine #135

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration
  • Audio commentary from 1990 featuring film scholar Leonard J. Leff
  • Isolated music and effects track
  • New conversation between film critic and author Molly Haskell and scholar Patricia White
  • New interview with film historian Craig Barron on Rebecca’s visual effects
  • Daphne du Maurier: In the Footsteps of “Rebecca,” a 2016 French television documentary
  • Making-of documentary from 2007
  • Footage of screen, hair, makeup, and costume tests for actors Joan Fontaine, Anne Baxter, Vivien Leigh, Margaret Sullavan, and Loretta Young
  • Casting gallery with notes by director Alfred Hitchcock and producer David O. Selznick
  • Hitchcock interviewed by Tom Snyder on a 1973 episode of NBC’s Tomorrow
  • Tomorrow interview with Fontaine from 1980
  • Audio interviews from 1986 with actor Judith Anderson and Fontaine
  • Three radio versions of Rebecca, from 1938, 1941, and 1950, including Orson Welles’s adaptation of the novel for the Mercury Theatre
  • Theatrical rerelease trailer
  • PLUS: An essay by critic and Selznick biographer David Thomson and selected Selznick production correspondence, including with Hitchcock

Cover painting by Robert Hunt

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration
  • Audio commentary from 1990 featuring film scholar Leonard J. Leff
  • Isolated music and effects track
  • New conversation between film critic and author Molly Haskell and scholar Patricia White
  • New interview with film historian Craig Barron on Rebecca’s visual effects
  • Daphne du Maurier: In the Footsteps of “Rebecca,” a 2016 French television documentary
  • Making-of documentary from 2007
  • Footage of screen, hair, makeup, and costume tests for actors Joan Fontaine, Anne Baxter, Vivien Leigh, Margaret Sullavan, and Loretta Young
  • Casting gallery with notes by director Alfred Hitchcock and producer David O. Selznick
  • Hitchcock interviewed by Tom Snyder on a 1973 episode of NBC’s Tomorrow
  • Tomorrow interview with Fontaine from 1980
  • Audio interviews from 1986 with actor Judith Anderson and Fontaine
  • Three radio versions of Rebecca, from 1938, 1941, and 1950, including Orson Welles’s adaptation of the novel for the Mercury Theatre
  • Theatrical rerelease trailer
  • PLUS: An essay by critic and Selznick biographer David Thomson and selected Selznick production correspondence, including with Hitchcock

Cover painting by Robert Hunt

Rebecca
Cast
Laurence Olivier
Maxim de Winter
Joan Fontaine
"I"
George Sanders
Jack Favell
Judith Anderson
Mrs. Danvers
Gladys Cooper
Beatrice Lacy
Nigel Bruce
Giles Lacy
Reginald Denny
Frank Crawley
C. Aubrey Smith
Colonel Julyan
Florence Bates
Mrs. Van Hopper
Melville Cooper
The coroner
Leo G. Carroll
Dr. Baker
Leonard Carey
Ben
Edward Fielding
Frith
Philip Winter
Robert
Credits
Director
Alfred Hitchcock
Produced by
David O. Selznick
Screenplay by
Robert E. Sherwood
Screenplay by
Joan Harrison
Adaptation by
Philip MacDonald
Adaptation by
Michael Hogan
Photographed by
George Barnes
Music by
Franz Waxman
Special effects by
Jack Cosgrove
Art direction
Lyle Wheeler
Interiors designed by
Joseph B. Platt
Interior decoration by
Howard Bristol
Supervising film editor
Hal C. Kern
Associate film editor
James E. Newcom

From The Current

Constructing the Eerie World of Rebecca
Constructing the Eerie World of Rebecca

Oscar-winning visual effects artist and film historian Craig Barron takes a close look at the techniques used to create the gothic atmosphere of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca.

/
Rebecca: Welcome to the Haunted House
Rebecca: Welcome to the Haunted House

Alfred Hitchcock achieved Oscar-winning success with this psychological thriller, a tumultuous collaboration with producer David O. Selznick.

By David Thomson

/
Eyes of Hitchcock
Jennifer Reeder’s Top 10

Jennifer Reeder’s award-winning personal fiction films, which explore relationships, trauma, and coping, have screened at Sundance, Berlin, Rotterdam, and several other festivals.


Meg Baird’s Top 10

Meg Baird is a founding member of the experimental folk collective Espers (Drag City). Her latest solo record, Don't Weigh Down the Light, is currently available through Drag City.


Chef du Cinema: The Lady Vanishes
Chef du Cinema: The Lady Vanishes

Sir Alfred Hitchcock once said, “I’m not a heavy eater. I’m just heavy, and I eat.” Hitchcock’s father was a grocer, so we can assume young Alfie grew up knowing his way around food. His films are filled with food and eating motifs, from th…

By Ron Deutsch

/
Leanne Shapton’s Top 10

An artist, art director, illustrator, and publisher based in New York City, Leanne Shapton designed the covers of the Criterion releases Kicking and Screaming and Cría cuervos . . . , and is the author of Was She Pretty?


Rebecca: The Two Mrs. de Winters

Rebecca marks the most decisive single step both in Hitchcock’s career and aesthetic evolution: the move to America, the first time working under (and intermittently struggling against) a powerful and dominating producer, the liberating extravaganc…

By Robin Wood


Rebecca

As David O. Selznick put Gone with the Wind into production in the late 1930s, he realized that he needed help with other pictures on the studio schedule. He had soon hired a rotund Englishman as director and producer, but Rebecca—the first of four…

By Leonard Leff