Yasujiro Ozu

Good Morning

Good Morning

A lighthearted take on director Yasujiro Ozu’s perennial theme of the challenges of inter­generational relationships, Good Morning tells the story of two young boys who stop speaking in protest after their parents refuse to buy a television set. Ozu weaves a wealth of subtle gags through a family portrait as rich as those of his dramatic films, mocking the foibles of the adult world through the eyes of his child protagonists. Shot in stunning color and set in a suburb of Tokyo where housewives gossip about the neighbors’ new washing machine and unemployed husbands look for work as door-to-door salesmen, this charming comedy refashions Ozu’s own silent classic I Was Born, But . . . to gently satirize consumerism in postwar Japan.

Film Info

  • Yasujiro Ozu
  • Japan
  • 1959
  • 93 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.33:1
  • Japanese
  • Spine #84

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • I Was Born, But . . ., Yasujiro Ozu’s 1932 silent comedy, with a 2008 score by Donald Sosin
  • New interview with film scholar David Bordwell
  • New video essay on Ozu’s use of humor by critic David Cairns
  • Fragment of A Straightforward Boy, a 1929 silent film by Ozu
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Jonathan Rosenbaum

New cover by Tatsuro Kiuchi

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • I Was Born, But . . ., Yasujiro Ozu’s 1932 silent comedy, with a 2008 score by Donald Sosin
  • New interview with film scholar David Bordwell
  • New video essay on Ozu’s use of humor by critic David Cairns
  • Fragment of A Straightforward Boy, a 1929 silent film by Ozu
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Jonathan Rosenbaum

New cover by Tatsuro Kiuchi

Good Morning
Cast
Masahiko Shimazu
Isamu
Koji Shidara
Minoru
Kuniko Miyake
Tamiko Hayash
Yoshiko Kuga
Setsuko Arita
Chishu Ryu
Keitaro Hayashi
Haruko Sugimura
Kikue Haraguchi
Credits
Director
Yasujiro Ozu
Screenplay
Yasujiro Ozu
Screenplay
Kogo Noda
Cinematography
Yushun Atsuta
Music
Toshiro Mayuzumi
Editing
Yoshiyasu Hamamura

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Good Morning: Structures and Strictures in Suburbia
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Mar 17, 2011
Good Morning

By Rick Prelinger

On Film / Essays — Aug 29, 2000

Explore

Yasujiro Ozu

Writer, Director

Yasujiro Ozu has often been called the “most Japanese” of Japan’s great directors. From 1927, the year of his debut for Shochiku studios, to 1962, when, a year before his death at age sixty, he made his final film, Ozu consistently explored the rhythms and tensions of a country trying to reconcile modern and traditional values, especially as played out in relations between the generations. Though he is best known for his sobering 1953 masterpiece Tokyo Story, the apex of his portrayals of the changing Japanese family, Ozu began his career in the thirties, in a more comedic, though still socially astute, mode, with such films as I Was Born, But . . . and Dragnet Girl. He then gradually mastered the domestic drama during the war years and afterward, employing both physical humor, as in Good Morning, and distilled drama, as in Late Spring, Early Summer, and Floating Weeds. Though Ozu was discovered relatively late in the Western world, his trademark rigorous style—static shots, often from the vantage point of someone sitting low on a tatami mat; patient pacing; moments of transcendence as represented by the isolated beauty of everyday objects—has been enormously influential among directors seeking a cinema of economy and poetry.