Ingmar Bergman

The Silence

The Silence

Two sisters—the sickly, intellectual Ester (Ingrid Thulin) and the sensual, pragmatic Anna (Gunnel Lindblom)—travel by train with Anna’s young son, Johan (Jörgen Lindström), to a foreign country that appears to be on the brink of war. Attempting to cope with their alien surroundings, each sister is left to her own vices while they vie for Johan’s affection, and in so doing sabotage what little remains of their relationship. Regarded as one of the most sexually provocative films of its day, Ingmar Bergman’s The Silence offers a disturbing vision of emotional isolation in a suffocating spiritual void.

Film Info

  • Ingmar Bergman
  • Sweden
  • 1963
  • 95 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.33:1
  • Swedish
  • Spine #211

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer
  • Exploring the film: Video discussion with Ingmar Bergman biographer Peter Cowie
  • Poster gallery for the trilogy films
  • Essay by film scholar Leo Braudy
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack
  • New and improved English subtitle translation

Available In

Collector's Set

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema

Blu-Ray Box Set

30 Discs

Ships Nov 20, 2018

$239.96

Collector's Set

A Film Trilogy by Ingmar Bergman

A Film Trilogy by Ingmar Bergman

DVD Box Set

4 Discs

$63.96

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer
  • Exploring the film: Video discussion with Ingmar Bergman biographer Peter Cowie
  • Poster gallery for the trilogy films
  • Essay by film scholar Leo Braudy
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • Optional English-dubbed soundtrack
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
The Silence
Cast
Ingrid Thulin
Ester
Gunnel Lindblom
Anna
Jörgen Lindström
Johan
Birger Malmsten
Bartender
Håkan Jahnberg
Hotel waiter
Eduardo Gutierrez
The little people
The Eduardinis
Credits
Director
Ingmar Bergman
Written and directed by
Ingmar Bergman
Assistant director
Lenn Hjortzberg
Assistant director
Lars-Erik Liedholm
Cinematography
Sven Nykvist
Assistant photographer
Rolf Holmqvist
Assistant photographer
Peter Wester
Production manager
Lars-Owe Carlberg
Editing
Ulla Ryghe
Sound
Stig Flodin
Sound
Bo Leverén
Sound
Tage Sjöborg
Music
Johann Sebastian Bach
Music
Robert Mersey
Music
Ivan Renliden
Mixing
Olle Jakobsson
Sets
P.A. Lundgren
Makeup
Börje Lundh

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The Silence

Two women, Anna and Ester, accompanied by Johan, Anna’s ten-year-old-son, travel slowly through the night by train into a foreign country that seems to be at war. They are sisters, it will turn out, perhaps lovers. We will never discover the reason…

By Leo Braudy


Explore

Ingmar Bergman

Writer, Director

The Swedish auteur began his artistic career in the theater but eventually navigated toward film—"the great adventure," as he called it—initially as a screenwriter and then as a director. Simply put, in the fifties and sixties, the name Ingmar Bergman was synonymous with European art cinema. Yet his incredible run of successes in that era—including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, and The Virgin Spring, haunting black-and-white elegies on the nature of God and death—merely paved the way for a long and continuously dazzling career that would take him from the daring “Silence of God” trilogy (Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, The Silence) to the existential terrors of Cries and Whispers to the family epic Fanny and Alexander, with which he “retired” from the cinema. Bergman died in July 2007, leaving behind one of the richest bodies of work in the history of cinema.