Hiroshi Teshigahara

Antonio Gaudí

Antonio Gaudí

Catalan architect Antonio Gaudí (1852–1926) designed some of the world’s most astonishing buildings, interiors, and parks; Japanese director Hiroshi Teshigahara constructed some of the most aesthetically audacious films ever made. Here their artistry melds in a unique, enthralling cinematic experience. Less a documentary than a visual poem, Teshigahara’s Antonio Gaudí takes viewers on a tour of Gaudí’s truly spectacular architecture, including his massive, still-unfinished masterpiece, the Sagrada Familia cathedral in Barcelona. With camera work as bold and sensual as the curves of his subject's organic structures, Teshigahara immortalizes Gaudí on film.

Film Info

Special Features

SPECIAL EDITION DOUBLE-DISC SET

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • New video interview with architect Arata Isozaki
  • Gaudí, Catalunya, 1959, footage from director Hiroshi Teshigahara's first trip to Spain
  • Visions of Space: Antonio Gaudí, a one-hour documentary on the architect's life and work
  • A BBC program on Gaudí by director Ken Russell
  • Sculptures by Sofu—Vita, a short film by Teshigahara on the sculpture of his father, Sofu Teshigahara
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by art historian Dore Ashton, a reminiscence by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and Hiroshi and Sofu discussing their trip to the West

New cover by Sarah Habibi

Purchase Options

On backorder, available Nov 9, 2018

Special Features

SPECIAL EDITION DOUBLE-DISC SET

  • New, restored high-definition digital transfer
  • New video interview with architect Arata Isozaki
  • Gaudí, Catalunya, 1959, footage from director Hiroshi Teshigahara's first trip to Spain
  • Visions of Space: Antonio Gaudí, a one-hour documentary on the architect's life and work
  • A BBC program on Gaudí by director Ken Russell
  • Sculptures by Sofu—Vita, a short film by Teshigahara on the sculpture of his father, Sofu Teshigahara
  • Original theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by art historian Dore Ashton, a reminiscence by Hiroshi Teshigahara, and Hiroshi and Sofu discussing their trip to the West

New cover by Sarah Habibi

Antonio Gaudí
Cast
Isidro Puig Boada
Interviewee
Seiji Miyaguchi
Boada's voice-over
Credits
Director
Hiroshi Teshigahara
Producer
Hiroshi Teshigahara
Editing
Hiroshi Teshigahara
Cinematography
Junichi Segawa
Cinematography
Yoshikazu Yanagida
Cinematography
Ryu Segawa
Music
Toru Takemitsu

From The Current

A Camera Dancing About Architecture
Antonio Gaudí: Border Crossings

During the Second World War, when Hiroshi Teshigahara was a schoolboy, Japan’s cities—above all his hometown, Tokyo—were mercilessly firebombed. He, and his future associates in countless artistic undertakings, returned to a landscape of bleak …

By Dore Ashton


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Toru Takemitsu

Composer

Japanese composer Toru Takemitsu, known to Western listeners predominantly as the man behind the music in such iconic movies as Woman in the Dunes and Ran, was an acclaimed classical composer and music theorist well before he became one of his country’s most reliably brilliant scorers of film. A noted musical avant-gardist in midcentury Japanese intellectual circles, as influenced by jazz as by Debussy, Takemitsu first turned to feature film composing when he was commissioned (along with Masaru Sato) to write the hip, twangy-guitar-inflected score for the Ko Nakahira youth flick Crazed Fruit (1956). It wasn’t until a few years later, though, when his friend Hiroshi Teshigahara asked him to score Teshigahara’s short debut film, José Torres (1959), that Takemitsu’s career in movies truly began. The deeply sympathetic working relationship that they discovered on that project resulted in Takemitsu’s providing the haunting, instrumentally jarring themes for virtually all of Teshigahara’s subsequent output (“He was always more than a composer,” Teshigahara would recall. “He involved himself so thoroughly in every aspect of a film—script, casting, location shooting, editing, and total sound design”). Takemitsu became a go-to guy for many other major Japanese filmmakers as well, including Masaki Kobayashi (Harakiri), Akira Kurosawa (Dodes’ka-den), and Nagisa Oshima (Empire of Passion); his themes remain some of the most beautiful, spectral music ever written for the screen.