Agnès Varda

Mur Murs

Mur Murs

After returning to Los Angeles from France in 1979, Agnès Varda created this kaleidoscopic documentary about the striking murals that decorate the city. Bursting with color and vitality, Mur Murs is as much an invigorating study of community and diversity as it is an essential catalog of unusual public art.

Film Info

  • Agnès Varda
  • France, United States
  • 1980
  • 82 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.37:1
  • French, English

Available In

Collector's Set

Eclipse Series 43: Agnès Varda in California

Agnès Varda in California

DVD Box Set

3 Discs

$35.96

Mur Murs
Credits
Director
Agnès Varda
Written by
Agnès Varda
Camera
Bernard Auroux
Sound
Lee Alexander
Editing
Sabine Mamou

From The Current

Agnès Varda on Coming to California
Agnès Varda on Coming to California

The incredible Agnès Varda, now eighty-seven years old, stopped by the Criterion Collection office this past April to talk to us about the amazing, sometimes surreal experience of moving to California from France in the late 1960s and and again in t…

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Eclipse Series 43: Agnès Varda in California
Eclipse Series 43: Agnès Varda in California

The films Agnès Varda made while living on the West Coast of the United States are some of the most searching and challenging of her stellar career.

By Michael Koresky

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Varda’s LA Comes to Omaha

Repertory Picks

Varda’s LA Comes to Omaha

Agnès Varda’s Mur Murs, a diverse and dynamic portrait of public art on the streets of Los Angeles, screens tonight at Omaha’s Film Streams.

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Agnès Varda Is Everywhere!
Agnès Varda Is Everywhere!

Agnès Varda keeps popping up in the most unexpected places.

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Explore

Agnès Varda

Writer, Director

The only female director of the French New Wave, Agnès Varda has been called both the movement’s mother and its grandmother. The fact that some have felt the need to assign her a specifically feminine role, and the confusion over how to characterize that role, speak to just how unique her place in this hallowed cinematic movement—defined by such decidedly masculine artists as Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut—is. Varda not only made films during the nouvelle vague, she helped inspire it. Her self-funded debut, the fiction-documentary hybrid 1956’s La Pointe Courte is often considered the unofficial first New Wave film; when she made it, she had no professional cinema training (her early work included painting, sculpting, and photojournalism). Though not widely seen, the film got her commissions to make several documentaries in the late fifties. In 1962, she released the seminal nouvelle vague film Cléo from 5 to 7; a bold character study that avoids psychologizing, it announced her official arrival. Over the coming decades, Varda became a force in art cinema, conceiving many of her films as political and feminist statements, and using a radical objectivity to create her unforgettable characters. She describes her style as cinécriture (writing on film), and it can be seen in formally audacious fictions like Le bonheur and Vagabond as well as more ragged and revealing autobiographical documentaries like The Gleaners and I and The Beaches of Agnès.