Aki Kaurismäki

Le Havre

Le Havre

In this warmhearted comic yarn from Aki Kaurismäki, fate throws the young African refugee Idrissa (Blondin Miguel) into the path of Marcel Marx (André Wilms), a kindly old bohemian who shines shoes for a living in the French harbor city Le Havre. With inborn optimism and the support of his tight-knit community, Marcel stands up to the officials doggedly pursuing the boy for deportation. A political fairy tale that exists somewhere between the reality of contemporary France and the classic French cinema of the past, Le Havre is a charming, deadpan delight and one of the Finnish director’s finest films.

Film Info

  • Aki Kaurismäki
  • France, Finland
  • 2011
  • 93 minutes
  • Color
  • 1.85:1
  • French
  • Spine #619

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer, approved by director Aki Kaurismäki, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • New interview with actor André Wilms
  • Footage from the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, including a press conference and a French television interview with cast and crew
  • Finnish television interview with actress Kati Outinen from 2011
  • Concert footage of Little Bob, the musician featured in the film
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by film critic Michael Sicinski and a 2011 conversation between Kaurismäki and film historian Peter von Bagh

New cover by Manuele Fior

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital transfer, approved by director Aki Kaurismäki, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • New interview with actor André Wilms
  • Footage from the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, including a press conference and a French television interview with cast and crew
  • Finnish television interview with actress Kati Outinen from 2011
  • Concert footage of Little Bob, the musician featured in the film
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by film critic Michael Sicinski and a 2011 conversation between Kaurismäki and film historian Peter von Bagh

New cover by Manuele Fior

Le Havre
Cast
André Wilms
Marcel Marx
Kati Outinen
Arletty
Jean-Pierre Darroussin
Monet
Blondin Miguel
Idrissa
Elina Salo
Claire
Evelyne Didi
Yvette
Quoc-Dung Nguyen
Chaing
Laika
Laika
François Monnié
Grocer
Roberto Piazza, a.k.a. Little Bob
Little Bob
Pierre Etaix
Dr. Becker
Jean-Pierre Léaud
Accuser
Luce Vigo
Sandwich vendor
Credits
Director
Aki Kaurismäki
Photographed by
Timo Salminen
Sound
Tero Malmberg
Art direction
Wouter Zoon
Costumes
Fred Cambier
Makeup
Valérie Théry-Hamel
Editing
Timo Linnasalo

From The Current

This Week on the Criterion Channel
This Week on the Criterion Channel

This week, we’re offering you the chance to go on a veritable viewing rampage, with this massive collection of fourteen kaiju classics, now streaming on the Criterion Channel on FilmStruck. Running from Ishiro Honda’s original Godzilla (1954) to …

Inside Criterion / On the Channel — Dec 8, 2017
Critics Are Loving Aki Kaurismäki’s The Other Side of Hope

Press Notes

Critics Are Loving Aki Kaurismäki’s The Other Side of Hope

One of the great masters of melancholy comedy, Finnish director Aki Kaurismäki, returns to theaters today with The Other Side of Hope, his first film since 2011’s Le Havre. Continuing his empathetic exploration of global migration, Kaurismäki’s…

On Film / In Theaters
Dec 1, 2017
Le Havre: “Always Be a Human”
Le Havre: “Always Be a Human”

Aki Kaurismäki’s latest working-class fable is his warmest, and his most political.

By Michael Sicinski

On Film / Essays — Jul 31, 2012

Explore

Aki Kaurismäki

Director

Even if he weren’t the world’s most famous Finnish filmmaker, Aki Kaurismäki’s singular place in cinema would be ensured by his distinctive and effortless mix of scalpel-sharp comedy, pitch-dark (The Match Factory Girl) or slapstick (Leningrad Cowboys Go America), with warm humanism. He started working in movies as his older brother Mika’s codirector, then struck out on his own with an adaptation of Crime and Punishment (1983). With his Proletariat Trilogy—Shadows in Paradise (1986), Ariel (1988), and The Match Factory Girl (1990), which find humor or romance in even the most desperate situations—and his zany musical comedies starring the fictional band the Leningrad Cowboys, Kaurismäki became a beloved figure in international film circles. The sardonic inventiveness of the former and the unexpected hipster hilarity of the latter confirmed him as an uncommon master, and his influence has been felt in works by the likes of Jim Jarmusch and Wes Anderson. Kaurismäki has continued to delight audiences with such films as the Oscar-nominated The Man Without a Past (2003) and Le Havre (2011), which evince his social commitment as well as his fluency in visual storytelling.


Read Kaurismäki’s Top 10.