• United Kingdom
  • 1961
  • 100 minutes
  • Black and White
  • 1.66:1
  • English
  •  

An extraordinary performance by Dirk Bogarde grounds this intense, sobering indictment of early-sixties social intolerance and sexual puritanism. Bogarde plays Melville Farr, a married barrister who is one of a large group of closeted London men who become targets of a blackmailer. Basil Dearden’s unmistakably political taboo buster was one of the first films to address homophobia head-on, a cry of protest against British laws forbidding homosexuality.

Credits

Film Essays

Eclipse Series 25: Basil Dearden’s London Underground

By Michael Koresky January 25, 2011

SAPPHIRE: INNER CITY Given his strikingly eclectic body of work, it’s not surprising that Basil Dearden has never become a household name—he’s too hard to pin down. Moving effortlessly among . . . Read more »

Big Screen

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Repertory Pick: Basil Dearden at the Film Society of Lincoln Center

April 21, 2016

Tomorrow, the Film Society of Lincoln Center begins its fascinating series An Early Clue to the New Direction: Queer Cinema Before Stonewall, organized by programmer at large Thomas Beard. Read more »


Clippings

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The BFI’s List of the Best LGBT Films of All Time

March 18, 2016

For the past thirty years, the British Film Institute has been honoring the best in contemporary and classic LGBT cinema from around the world, with its annual BFI Flare: London LGBT Film . . . Read more »


Photo Galleries

Ready for His Close-up

December 07, 2012


Photo Galleries

Dearden Times Four

March 10, 2011


Press Notes

Press Notes: Basil Dearden’s London Underground

February 03, 2011

“One of the best Eclipse releases yet,” raves Mike Restaino at DVD File.Basil Dearden’s London Underground provides the kind of one-two punch that Eclipse is so notable for accomplishing . . . . . . Read more »


Film Essays

Eclipse Series 25: Basil Dearden’s London Underground

By Michael Koresky January 25, 2011

SAPPHIRE: INNER CITY Given his strikingly eclectic body of work, it’s not surprising that Basil Dearden has never become a household name—he’s too hard to pin down. Moving effortlessly among . . . Read more »

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