Michelangelo Antonioni

L’avventura

L’avventura

Michelangelo Antonioni invented a new film grammar with this masterwork. An iconic piece of challenging 1960s cinema and a gripping narrative on its own terms, L’avventura concerns the enigmatic disappearance of a young woman during a yachting trip off the coast of Sicily, and the search taken up by her disaffected lover (Gabriele Ferzetti) and best friend (Monica Vitti, in her breakout role). Antonioni’s controversial international sensation is a gorgeously shot tale of modern ennui and spiritual isolation.

Film Info

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Audio commentary featuring film historian Gene Youngblood
  • Olivier Assayas on “L’avventura,” an analysis of the film in three parts
  • Antonioni: Documents and Testimonials, a fifty-eight-minute documentary by Gianfranco Mingozzi from 1966
  • Writings by director Michelangelo Antonioni, read by actor Jack Nicholson, plus Nicholson’s personal recollections of the director
  • Trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Geoffrey Nowell-Smith, Antonioni’s statements about the film after its 1960 Cannes Film Festival premiere, and an open letter distributed at the festival

New cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang

Purchase Options

Collector's Sets

Collector's Set

Essential Art House: 50 Years of Janus Films

Essential Art House: 50 Years of Janus Films

DVD Box Set

50 Discs

$650.00

Special Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Audio commentary featuring film historian Gene Youngblood
  • Olivier Assayas on “L’avventura,” an analysis of the film in three parts
  • Antonioni: Documents and Testimonials, a fifty-eight-minute documentary by Gianfranco Mingozzi from 1966
  • Writings by director Michelangelo Antonioni, read by actor Jack Nicholson, plus Nicholson’s personal recollections of the director
  • Trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Geoffrey Nowell-Smith, Antonioni’s statements about the film after its 1960 Cannes Film Festival premiere, and an open letter distributed at the festival

New cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang

L’avventura
Cast
Gabriele Ferzetti
Sandro
Monica Vitti
Claudia
Lea Massari
Anna
Dominique Blanchar
Giulia
Renzo Ricci
Anna's father
James Addams
Corrado
Dorothy De Poliolo
Gloria Perkins
Lelio Luttazzi
Raimondo
Giovanni Petrucci
Young prince
Esmeralda Ruspoli
Patrizia
Credits
Director
Michelangelo Antonioni
Producer
Amato Pennasilico
Screenplay
Michelangelo Antonioni
Screenplay
Elio Bartolini
Screenplay
Tonino Guerra
Cinematography
Aldo Scavarda
Production design
Piero Poletto
Music
Giovanni Fusco
Editor
Eraldo Da Roma
Assistant director
Jack O'Connell
Costume design
Adriana Berselli
Sound
Claudio Maielli
Production coordinator
Angelo Corso

From The Current

Three Reasons: L’avventura
Three Reasons: L’avventura

ion for the video could go here and be however long it needd to be, within reason, of course.

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L’avventura: A Present Absence

L’avventura: A Present Absence

A group of rich Italians is on a cruise off the coast of Sicily when one of their number—a moody, unhappy young woman—disappears. Murder, kidnapping, accident, suicide? Her boyfriend and her close friend search for her, but the search turns into …

By Geoffrey Nowell-Smith

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David Bordwell on the Restraint of L’avventura
David Bordwell on the Restraint of L’avventura

The premiere screening of Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’avventura in 1960 was one of the most infamously divisive in Cannes Film Festival history. While Antonioni’s opaque characterizations and languorous pacing retain their ability to befuddle un…

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L’avventura: Cannes Statement

Features

L’avventura: Cannes Statement

Director Michelangelo Antonioni made these famous remarks at the press conference following the May 1960 Cannes Film Festival premiere of L’avventura. They appear here in a translation published in the spring 1962 issue of the journal Film Culture.…

By Michelangelo Antonioni


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Sight & Sound Poll 2012: L’avventura
Sight & Sound Poll 2012: L’avventura

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Andrew Haigh’s Top 10

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The Dawn of L’avventura
The Dawn of L’avventura

Michelangelo Antonioni changed the landscape of art cinema with his breakout L’avventura. Achingly beautiful and mysterious as a deep, dark cave, this chronicle of a disappearance and the illicit affair that rises in its wake opened in New York on …

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A Whole New Avventura
A Whole New Avventura

Stage-bound is not a term one is apt to associate with the minimalist, resolutely un-dialogue-driven movie worlds of Michelangelo Antonioni. But that hasn’t deterred Ivo van Hove (the artistic director of the Netherlands’ most acclaimed theater c…

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L’avventura

Many films are called “classic,” but few qualify as turning points in the evolution of cinematic language, films that opened the way to a more mature art form. Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura (The Adventure) is such a work. It divided fi…

By Gene Youngblood


Explore

Michelangelo Antonioni

Director

Though Michelangelo Antonioni worked throughout the forties (on short documentaries like N.U., about street cleaners in Rome) and fifties (including writing the story that was the basis for Federico Fellini’s The White Sheik, and directing his first fiction features, including the penetrating films about bourgeois Italian life Story of a Love Affair and Le amiche), it was in the 1960s that he became a major force in international film. It was also then that he began to typify, alongside such artists as Fellini, Ingmar Bergman, and Alain Resnais, a new European art cinema, expressing a distinctly contemporary ennui. With their stunning visuals, ambiguous narratives, and still relevant focus on modern alienation, Antonioni’s films of this period, all starring Monica Vitti, his lover at the time—L’avventura (famously booed at Cannes for confounding its audience with its longueurs and lack of closure), La notte, L’eclisse, Red Desert—have stood the test of time. And his less iconic later films, like Identification of a Woman, have only grown more compelling and mysterious as the years have passed.