L’eclisse

The concluding chapter of Michelangelo Antonioni’s informal trilogy on contemporary malaise (following L’avventura and La notte), L’eclisse tells the story of a young woman (Monica Vitti) who leaves one lover (Francisco Rabal) and drifts into a relationship with another (Alain Delon). Using the architecture of Rome as a backdrop for the doomed affair, Antonioni achieves the apotheosis of his style in this return to the theme that preoccupied him the most: the difficulty of connection in an alienating modern world.

Film Info

Special Features

  • High-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
  • Audio commentary by film scholar Richard Peña
  • Michelangelo Antonioni: The Eye That Changed Cinema (2001), a fifty-six-minute documentary exploring the director’s life and career
  • Elements of Landscape, a twenty-two-minute piece from 2005 about Antonioni and L’eclisse, featuring Italian film critic Adriano Aprà and longtime Antonioni friend Carlo di Carlo
  • PLUS: Essays by film critics Jonathan Rosenbaum and Gilberto Perez, as well as excerpts from Antonioni’s writing about his work

Cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • High-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
  • Audio commentary by film scholar Richard Peña
  • Michelangelo Antonioni: The Eye That Changed Cinema (2001), a fifty-six-minute documentary exploring the director’s life and career
  • Elements of Landscape, a twenty-two-minute piece from 2005 about Antonioni and L’eclisse, featuring Italian film critic Adriano Aprà and longtime Antonioni friend Carlo di Carlo
  • PLUS: Essays by film critics Jonathan Rosenbaum and Gilberto Perez, as well as excerpts from Antonioni’s writing about his work

Cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang

L’eclisse
Cast
Alain Delon
Piero
Monica Vitti
Vittoria
Francisco Rabal
Riccardo
Lilla Brignone
Vittoria’s mother
Louis Seigner
Stockbroker
Rossana Rory
Anita
Mirella Ricciardi
Marta
Credits
Director
Michelangelo Antonioni
Story and screenplay
Michelangelo Antonioni
Story and screenplay
Tonino Guerra
with collaboration from
Elio Bartolini
with collaboration from
Ottiero Ottieri
Produced by
Robert Hakim
Produced by
Raymond Hakim
Photography by
Gianni di Venanzo
Editing
Eraldo Da Roma
Music
Giovanni Fusco
Sound
Claudio Maielli
Sound assistant
Mario Bramonti
Assistant directors
Gianni Arduini
Assistant directors
Franco Indovina
Production manager
Danilo Marciani
Set design
Piero Poletto

From The Current

L’eclisse: Antonioni and Vitti
L’eclisse: Antonioni and Vitti

In the history of cinema, there have been several notable collaborations between a director and an actress over a series of films. Think of D. W. Griffith and Lillian Gish back in the silent era, Josef von Sternberg and Marlene Dietrich in the early …

By Gilberto Perez

/
L’eclisse: A Vigilance of Desire
L’eclisse: A Vigilance of Desire

Your vigilance as an artist is an amorous vigilance, a vigilance of desire.—Roland Barthes to Michelangelo Antonioni, 1979 It’s lamentable that Michelangelo Antonioni, one of the most fashionable vanguard European filmmakers during the sixties, h…

By Jonathan Rosenbaum

/
Douglas Hart’s Top 10

Douglas Hart is a filmmaker, video director, and founding member of the Jesus and Mary Chain.


Duncan Hannah’s Top 10

Duncan Hannah is a New York City–based artist whose paintings have been featured in over seventy solo exhibitions around the world since his debut in 1980.


Bret Easton Ellis’s Top 10

Bret Easton Ellis sent us his ten favorite Criterion films in alphabetical order, with the caveat that his list “could have been different last week and it might be different next week.”


John Bailey’s Top 10

About selecting his favorites from the collection, world-class cinematographer John Bailey (Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters) says, “One of the greatest challenges in trying to compile a list like this is to separate the objectively ‘great’ fil


A Whole New Avventura
A Whole New Avventura

Stage-bound is not a term one is apt to associate with the minimalist, resolutely un-dialogue-driven movie worlds of Michelangelo Antonioni. But that hasn’t deterred Ivo van Hove (the artistic director of the Netherlands’ most acclaimed theater c…

/
James Franco’s Top 10

“I am obsessed with the Criterion Collection . . . Basically, I have every disc in the collection, and I am making my way through them all. It’s rare that I watch one I don’t like.”


Michael Barker’s Top 10

Michael Barker and his copresidents at Sony Pictures Classics, Tom Bernard and Marcie Bloom, have brought out some of the best and most successful independent and international films of the last two decades, from Women on the Verge of a Nervous Break


Ramin Bahrani’s Top 10

Iranian-American writer and director Ramin Bahrani’s feature films include: Man Push Cart (2005), Chop Shop (2007), Goodbye Solo (2009), 99 Homes (2014), and Fahrenheit 451 (2018).


On His Art: L’eclisse

A director is naturally a man like everyone else. Yet his life isn’t normal. For us, seeing is a necessity. For a painter, too, the problem is to see. But while the painter has to discover a static reality, or even a rhythm, perhaps—but a rhythm …

By Michelangelo Antonioni


Antonioni on Antonioni:
“Making a Film Is My Way of Life”

The first time I put an eye behind a camera (a 16mm Bell & Howell), it was in a lunatic asylum. The head of the institution was a great big hulk of a man with a face so ravaged by time that it resembled those of his patients. I was still living t…


Explore

Michelangelo Antonioni

Director

Though Michelangelo Antonioni worked throughout the forties (on short documentaries like N.U., about street cleaners in Rome) and fifties (including writing the story that was the basis for Federico Fellini’s The White Sheik, and directing his first fiction features, including the penetrating films about bourgeois Italian life Story of a Love Affair and Le amiche), it was in the 1960s that he became a major force in international film. It was also then that he began to typify, alongside such artists as Fellini, Ingmar Bergman, and Alain Resnais, a new European art cinema, expressing a distinctly contemporary ennui. With their stunning visuals, ambiguous narratives, and still relevant focus on modern alienation, Antonioni’s films of this period, all starring Monica Vitti, his lover at the time—L’avventura (famously booed at Cannes for confounding its audience with its longueurs and lack of closure), La notte, L’eclisse, Red Desert—have stood the test of time. And his less iconic later films, like Identification of a Woman, have only grown more compelling and mysterious as the years have passed.