8½

Marcello Mastroianni plays Guido Anselmi, a director whose new project is collapsing around him, along with his life. One of the greatest films about film ever made, Federico Fellini’s (Otto e mezzo) turns one man’s artistic crisis into a grand epic of the cinema. An early working title for was The Beautiful Confusion, and Fellini’s masterpiece is exactly that: a shimmering dream, a circus, and a magic act.

Film Info

  • Federico Fellini
  • Italy, France
  • 1963
  • 138 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.85:1
  • English, French, German, Italian
  • Spine #140

Special Features

  • High-definition digital transfer of restored film elements, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on Blu-ray edition
  • Introduction by filmmaker Terry Gilliam
  • Audio commentary featuring film critic and Fellini friend Gideon Bachmann and NYU film professor Antonio Monda
  • High-definition digital transfer of a new restoration of Fellini: A Director’s Notebook, a 52-minute film by Federico Fellini
  • The Last Sequence, a new 52-minute documentary on Fellini’s lost alternate ending for (Blu-ray only)
  • Nino Rota: Between Cinema and Concert, a compelling 48-minute documentary about Fellini’s longtime composer
  • Interviews with actress Sandra Milo, director Lina Wertmüller, and cinematographer Vittorio Storaro
  • Rare photographs from Bachmann’s collection
  • Gallery of behind-the-scenes and production photos
  • U.S. theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring writings by Fellini and essays by critics Tullio Kezich and Alexander Sesonske

New cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang

Purchase Options

Special Features

  • High-definition digital transfer of restored film elements, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on Blu-ray edition
  • Introduction by filmmaker Terry Gilliam
  • Audio commentary featuring film critic and Fellini friend Gideon Bachmann and NYU film professor Antonio Monda
  • High-definition digital transfer of a new restoration of Fellini: A Director’s Notebook, a 52-minute film by Federico Fellini
  • The Last Sequence, a new 52-minute documentary on Fellini’s lost alternate ending for (Blu-ray only)
  • Nino Rota: Between Cinema and Concert, a compelling 48-minute documentary about Fellini’s longtime composer
  • Interviews with actress Sandra Milo, director Lina Wertmüller, and cinematographer Vittorio Storaro
  • Rare photographs from Bachmann’s collection
  • Gallery of behind-the-scenes and production photos
  • U.S. theatrical trailer
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring writings by Fellini and essays by critics Tullio Kezich and Alexander Sesonske

New cover by Lucien S. Y. Yang

8½
Cast
Marcello Mastroianni
Guido Anselmi
Bruno Agostini
Bruno Agostini
Sandra Milo
Carla
Anouk Aimée
Luisa Anselmi
Barbara Steele
Gloria Morin
Caterina Boratto
The Beautiful Woman
Claudia Cardinale
Claudia
Credits
Producer
Angelo Rizzoli
Cinematography
Gianni Di Venanzo
Screenplay
Ennio Flaiano
Screenplay
Federico Fellini
Screenplay
Tullio Pinelli
Screenplay
Brunello Rondi
Music
Nino Rota
Director
Federico Fellini
Production design
Piero Gherardi
Editing
Leo Catozzo
Sound
Alberto Bartolomei
Sound
Mario Faraoni

From The Current

8         ½: When “He” Became “I”
8 ½: When “He” Became “I”
Until the time when he was consecrated as a great director, Fellini didn’t have an easy relationship with writers, his contemporaries who used to gather in the evening in Via Veneto’s many cafés. In those circles, the filmmaker was merely tolera…

By Tullio Kezich

8½: A Film with Itself as Its Subject
8½: A Film with Itself as Its Subject
8½: a bizarre and puzzling title, but one precisely appropriate for this film, which announces in its first frame that modernism has reached the cinema. If the mark of modernism in art is self-reference, 8½ surely goes beyond any predecessor in hav…

By Alexander Sesonske

Terry Gilliam’s Closet Picks
Terry Gilliam’s Closet Picks

While in town for the release of his new movie The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, the legendary filmmaker stopped by to pick up some Criterion favorites.

Mira Nair’s Guide to the Collection
Mira Nair’s Guide to the Collection

The writer-director of Monsoon Wedding and Salaam Bombay! takes us through an eclectic mix of favorite films, including works by Jane Campion, Lars von Trier, and Satyajit Ray.

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Explore

Federico Fellini

Writer, Director

Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini

One of Italy’s great modern directors, Federico Fellini was a larger-than-life maestro who created an inimitable cinematic style combining surreal carnival with incisive social critique. While his most popular—and accessible—film, the darkly nostalgic childhood memoir Amarcord, is a great entryway into his oeuvre, , a collage of memories, dreams, and fantasies about a director’s artistic crisis, is perhaps his masterpiece. In his early career, Fellini was both a screenwriter for neorealist pioneer Roberto Rossellini and a newspaper caricaturist in postwar Rome, competing influences he would bring together with startling results. After such early works as I vitelloni, Fellini broke away from neorealism’s political strictures with the beloved La strada, and from there boldly explored his obsessions with the circus, societal decadence, spiritual redemption, and, most controversially, women, in such films as Nights of Cabiria, Juliet of the Spirits, and And the Ship Sails On.