Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

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Restoration as Reimagining History

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Restoration as Reimagining History

The efforts of The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project have served as a powerful vehicle for reconfiguring the history of the art form in critical and expansive ways.

By Cecilia Cenciarelli

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Soleil Ô: “I Bring You Greetings from Africa”

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Soleil Ô: “I Bring You Greetings from Africa

With his deeply political but unclassifiable debut feature, Med Hondo set out to establish a transformational presence for global African cinema and to accelerate the emergence of a new Africa.

By Aboubakar Sanogo

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Downpour: Furtive Glances

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Downpour: Furtive Glances

With humor and verve, Bahram Beyzaie’s Iranian New Wave classic captures a moment in Iranian history when dissent against the authoritarian shah was beginning to percolate below the surface.

By Hamid Naficy

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Dos monjes: Expressionism a la Mexicana

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Dos monjes: Expressionism a la Mexicana

Made at a time when the Mexican film industry was searching for its own identity, this boldly stylized melodrama anticipated an experimental cinema that was never given adequate room to develop.

By Elisa Lozano

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Pixote: Out in the Streets

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Pixote: Out in the Streets

Drawing from a longstanding tradition of neorealist naturalism in Brazilian cinema, Héctor Babenco’s third feature is a brutal tale of urban survival that became his international breakthrough.

By Stephanie Dennison

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Lucía: In Progress

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

Lucía: In Progress

Humberto Solás’s ambitious epic unites the imperatives of postrevolutionary Cuban cinema, capturing lived experience in a time of rapid change while also rescuing the past from distortion and amnesia.

By Dennis Lim

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After the Curfew: A Nation of Dead Ends

Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project No. 3

After the Curfew: A Nation of Dead Ends

In this masterpiece from the father of modern Indonesian cinema, Usmar Ismail, a violent military culture grips the nation in the years following a brutal revolution.

By Adrian Jonathan Pasaribu

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