Author Spotlight

Bilge Ebiri

Bilge Ebiri is a writer and editor for New York magazine, and has written for the Village Voice, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Bookforum, and many other publications.

15 Results
Man Push Cart: A Melancholy Pull

Set in a transient, post-9/11 New York City, Rahmin Bahrani’s feature debut follows the Sisyphean toil of a Pakistani immigrant whose life teeters on the verge of catastrophe.

By Bilge Ebiri

A Singular Voice, in Short

Martin Scorsese’s stylistically varied early short films reveal the energy and invention that would make him one of the most exciting American directors of his time.

By Bilge Ebiri

Fail Safe: Very Little Left of the World

Sidney Lumet brought his vivid sense of the messiness of human experience to this stark nuclear thriller, which centers on a series of earth-shattering decisions made in quiet rooms.

By Bilge Ebiri

Until the End of the World: The End of the Road

Wim Wenders’ string of successes in the eighties freed him to mount one of the most ambitious productions in European film history, an epic he characterized as “the ultimate road movie.”

By Bilge Ebiri

Cannes 2019

A Leading Palestinian Auteur Looks Toward the Light

Elia Suleiman, who returned to Cannes this year with his latest film, talks with us about comedy as a form of political resistance.

By Bilge Ebiri

Cannes 2019

A Filmmaking Family Takes to the Streets

Legendary activist filmmaker Fernando Solanas joins his son and daughter in Cannes for their latest project, a chronicle of the long, hard fight for abortion rights in Argentina.

By Bilge Ebiri

Funny Games: Don’t You Want to See How It Ends?

With this controversial treatise on violence and media, Michael Haneke created a spectacle that is both intensely watchable and hard to stomach.


By Bilge Ebiri

24 Frames: The World Made Visible

After years of paring his filmmaking down to the bare essentials, Abbas Kiarostami delivered this gorgeous and boldly minimalist meditation on time, movement, and image-making.

By Bilge Ebiri

Graduation: Where Are You, Romeo?
The scenes in Romeo’s car—as it glides through the streets, the strains of Purcell and Vivaldi undulating—stand in sharp visual and aural contrast to the handheld economy of much of the rest of the film, which focuses tightly on dialogue exchan…

By Bilge Ebiri

Law of the Border: Breaking Boundaries and Building Bridges

By turns gritty and lyrical, this portrait of the Syria-Turkey border brings together two pioneers of Turkish cinema.

By Bilge Ebiri

Walking with Scorsese

An exhibition at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image explores Martin Scorsese’s creative process, his deep personal connection to his films, and his lifelong cinephilia.

By Bilge Ebiri

Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams: Quiet Devastation

Akira Kurosawa lays bare his deepest fears in this visually astonishing interpretation of folklore, myth, and the director’s own dreams and memories.

By Bilge Ebiri

The Fisher King: In the Kingdom of the Imperfect

Terry Gilliam touches down in the real world for the first time with this fanciful tale of blurred class boundaries in New York City.

By Bilge Ebiri

Dry Summer: The Laws of Nature

Metin Erksan’s shocking and sensuous tale of greed and rural life was part of a vibrant Turkish cinema of the fifties and sixties.

By Bilge Ebiri

Three Outlaw Samurai: The Disloyal Bunch
For nearly three decades, Hideo Gosha (1929–1992) made some of the most explosive, artful, and original films in Japanese cinema. Along the way, he also became one of his country’s most established and acclaimed filmmakers. But his reputation in …

By Bilge Ebiri